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Automatic wire strippers!



 
 
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  #21  
Old April 15th 17, 03:58 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,free.spam
John Doe[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 411
Default Automatic wire strippers!

These were not available "40 years ago". Nor must you "get the wire into
the right hole".

Apparently this idiot cannot follow a link and does not even know
what tool it is talking about...

--
Michael Black et472 ncf.ca wrote:

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From: Michael Black et472 ncf.ca
Newsgroups: alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Subject: Automatic wire strippers!
Date: Sat, 15 Apr 2017 00:02:46 -0400
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On Thu, 13 Apr 2017, Paul wrote:

John Doe wrote:
VanguardLH V nguard.LH wrote:

http://www.irwin.com/tools/pliers-ad...wrenches/self-
adjusting-wire-stripper

https://www.amazon.com/IRWIN-VISE-GR...ting-Stripper-
2078300/dp/B000OQ21CA/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1492117062&sr=8-3
&keywords=Self-Adjusting+Wire+Stripper

Tried it on some regular power cord wire. Wonderful. I so
wish I had this decades ago. Then again, it wasn't available
decades ago. Not that I do that much, but it would have been
so much nicer. Wire stripping has always been a hassle. I do
not like losing a strand or two of stranded wire. Apparently
this tool does not damage the wire.


Automatic wire strippers have existed for a long time.

We had a pair at work.

Only problem with them was:

1) Price. They charged "industrial" prices for them.
2) Probably didn't work quite as well as the one you got.

They look like a good idea, which is why I've had a set for almost 40
years, getting it for Christmas one year.

But they don't work out the same way.

You get used to using cutters to strip off insulation, getting the depth
right, and it's relatively easy.

You do have to fuss with automatic wire strippers, to get the wire into
the right hole (though some use some other method like a plastic razor
blad or something so you don't have to fit the wire into the hole).

But the biggest issue is they don't work where they might best be used.
If you have a short piece of wire, it's hard to hold the wire and then the
cutters to get the insulation off. But if the wire is too short, the tool
hasn't got enough space to hold the wire, either.

I thought they'd be great if you needed to strip a piece of wire already soldered into a
circuit, where again you may not get a tight grip on the wire, and the
soldered joint isn't strong enough to hold as you strip. But the auto
wire strippers are big, and use up a lot of space in operation, and that
limits their use in tight chassis.

So after a period of using them, I exiled them to the back of the tool
drawer, a neat idea that doesn't work out so well in everyday use.

I suppose if I was stripping a lot of wire of the same length, they might
be useful.

Michael


I played with ours at work, but

felt no attraction to them. They were a novelty item in the tool chest.

I did most of my work with this style.

http://www.officedepot.com/a/product...Stripper-Wire/

Everyone has probably seen this kind, and these suck.
It takes a good deal of practice to keep the wire
nicking to a minimum. I used these for some number of
years as a hobbyist, before I got my first T-5 style
stripper. The non-automated ones still take practice,
but the ones in the following picture make the practice
brutal. I expect a lot of people, this is all they had
on sale at the hardware store.

http://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/ma...9937p.html#srp

And there are all sorts of insulation types, each with
their own foibles. Not every wire stripping job is easy.

Paul




  #22  
Old April 26th 17, 05:26 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Diesel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 25
Default Automatic wire strippers!

VanguardLH Sat,
15 Apr 2017 06:42:01 GMT in alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt, wrote:

not the end-all to all education. As I mentioned, I've watched
REAL electricians (humans, not videos) doing their jobs for
decades.


So, you aren't actually an electrician either then? Do you have any
certs/license in the electrical/IT trades?

I've yet, in all that time, seen one take out a pair of
auto-strippers when they are ON THE JOB and using the tools they
toted with them.


I'm sorry, but, whatever you've personally seen doesn't matter. I've
used them, other electricians I know personally have used them. *shrug*
I don't know how many electricians you've seen do their jobs, but, you
seem to be viewing a very limited sample. Are they all by chance union?

Auto-strippers are something they use back at
their static workplace. At a workbench with lots of toolboxes or
cabinets or pegboards, you can have loads of tools.


Yes, and no. We use them there, we use them on the jobsite, too! It
depends on the situation we find ourselves in...



--
I would like to apologize for not having offended you yet.
Please be patient. I will get to you shortly.
  #23  
Old April 26th 17, 05:26 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Diesel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 25
Default Automatic wire strippers!

Michael Black
xample.org Sat, 15
Apr 2017 04:02:46 GMT in alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt, wrote:

But they don't work out the same way.


It depends on the style of automatic stripper. Some have several
holes for each ga wire they support and you slip the wire in, much
like you do the old school strippers. Another style has no such
holes, it has an area that 'holds' the wire, and another which has an
upper/lower blade and this pulls the insulation free.

You do have to fuss with automatic wire strippers, to get the wire
into the right hole (though some use some other method like a
plastic razor blad or something so you don't have to fit the wire
into the hole).


I haven't seen plastic ones...Only metal.

But the biggest issue is they don't work where they might best be
used. If you have a short piece of wire, it's hard to hold the
wire and then the cutters to get the insulation off. But if the
wire is too short, the tool hasn't got enough space to hold the
wire, either.


That depends on the specific automatic stripper, too. Some are
physically smaller than others. Some have bulkier 'heads' as a result
of having multiple holes for the GA of wire you intend to strip.

I thought they'd be great if you needed to strip a piece of wire
already soldered into a circuit, where again you may not get a
tight grip on the wire, and the soldered joint isn't strong enough
to hold as you strip. But the auto wire strippers are big, and
use up a lot of space in operation, and that limits their use in
tight chassis.


Depending on the ones you've got, they are great for this purpose.

So after a period of using them, I exiled them to the back of the
tool drawer, a neat idea that doesn't work out so well in everyday
use.


So you've got a single pair, and, you base your decision concerning
all of them on that?

I suppose if I was stripping a lot of wire of the same length,
they might be useful.


That they are! Most certainly. Especially if you have panel makeup
work to do.




--
I would like to apologize for not having offended you yet.
Please be patient. I will get to you shortly.
  #24  
Old April 26th 17, 06:54 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
John Doe[_9_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 411
Default Automatic wire strippers!

I like them not just because they are faster and easier, but
also because they do a better job. I knew that immediately
when I borrowed them because the wire I stripped was
extremely thin stranded, thinner than telephone wires.
Probably HDMI wire. No experience, no instruction, and it
stripped the wires without breaking any ultra thin strands.
It even did a few wires at the same time. It was obvious.
  #25  
Old April 27th 17, 08:02 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Diesel[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 25
Default Automatic wire strippers!

John Doe news Wed, 26 Apr 2017 05:54:12 GMT in alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,
wrote:

I like them not just because they are faster and easier, but
also because they do a better job. I knew that immediately
when I borrowed them because the wire I stripped was
extremely thin stranded, thinner than telephone wires.
Probably HDMI wire. No experience, no instruction, and it
stripped the wires without breaking any ultra thin strands.
It even did a few wires at the same time. It was obvious.


I just got back from picking up an Etek Self adjusting wire stripper
for under $20. I've been happy with their DMMs so far, despite them
not being true RMS. It didn't disappoint me. I put a stranded, 14ga I
think it is wire in it, and without any fine tuning adjustment
whatsoever made a perfect! strip of the insulation. This one's a
keeper, for sure. It doesn't have individual holes in a bulky strip
head like some others I've seen, either. It has 3 bars top and bottom
that can be adjusted which hold the wire, and a blade on the top and
bottom on the other side that removes the insulation. I felt
absolutely no pulling effect on the other end of the wire either.
This will be fantastic for dealing with wires that are already
soldered on something. Seems to be well built and sturdy, always a
plus.

I can see myself stripping wire much faster with this tool than I
would be able my other manual strippers. I've got multiple sets of
them, able to deal with very small ga wire; for telephone, etc. It's
already in one of my toolboxes, along side one of the Etek manual
voltage selection DMM units. I'm going to pair it with a fluke HV
probe soon and give it a go. It meets the 10MOhm resistance
requirement for the 1000:1 ratio for the probe. Spacing is just right
for the banana pins too.

Btw, I was price shopping the other day at lowes and home depot. Did
you know Home depot is carrying KLEIN tools now? I see another clamp
on meter in my not so distant future. G Lowes actually has a few
Fluke DMMS, but, they're all auto voltage models. I don't want that,
I prefer to manual select.




--
I would like to apologize for not having offended you yet.
Please be patient. I will get to you shortly.
  #26  
Old April 27th 17, 04:10 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,806
Default Automatic wire strippers!

On Thu, 27 Apr 2017 07:02:07 -0000 (UTC), Diesel
wrote:

Lowes actually has a few
Fluke DMMS, but, they're all auto voltage models. I don't want that,
I prefer to manual select.


Bought this ...

KeJie KJ-9208
Current/Voltage/Capacitance/Resistance/Temperature/Frequency Digital
Multimeter

from here ...

http://www.dx.com/p/2-6-lcd-current-...8#.WQIEb3WLWWE

The manual ...
http://www.kjinstrument.com/support/

Ev..ery..thing, besides an obsequious audible continuity checker,
baring of course the kitchen sink. Nickel/dime change for
ab..so..lutely no complaints (same goes for a cheap workingman's
Chinese soldering station - base not tip controlled temp settings.
Mostly do Ebay viz Singapore's link to heartland industrial Chinese
electronics, tho neither those items were and had to hunt them down
old school).
 




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