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Printers survive 83 alone



 
 
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  #11  
Old June 3rd 17, 11:21 PM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24
Default Printers survive 83 alone

In message , VanguardLH
writes:
micky wrote:

I might have posted here 3 months ago looking for help on how to
schedule a print job for every month I was gone, so my inkjet printer
heads wouldn't dry out.


For long term storage, keep the cartridges humidified. Take the
cartridges out of the printer, put them (nozzles up) in an airtight
plastic tub that has a lid. Do NOT use a plastic bag. Put a damp cloth
in the tub and attach lid. Store the tub out of sunlight, like in a
drawer.


A long time ago, some printers used to come with a humidor for that
purpose. I think mainly the ones that could use either a large black
cartridge, or a small one with colour cartridges, and the humidor was
for storing the one(s) you weren't using.

While the cartridges are stored outside the printer, pull the power cord
to the printer to prevent it from running a self-test or calibration at
periodic intervals or when repowering (by you because you powered it off
during non-use or after a power outage). My aunt complained about ink
getting dumped into a waste tank (aka diaper aka spittoon) every time
she powered up her Epson. Also, different printers waste different


Some - I know at least one Brother model did - "count" how much goes
into the waste tank/pad/whatever, and eventually refuse to work, on the
basis that the level in it has reached the point where it is likely to
cause smearing - even if it isn't actually doing so. For that particular
model, we found at least one video on YouTube telling you how to reset
that counter (it didn't involve doing anything with the hardware, just
software actions); obviously it didn't actually empty the tank, so in
theory the printer _would_ eventually start smearing. (Actually emptying
the tank is I understand not too practical, involving breaking into
parts of the printer it's beyond the home user to repair afterwards.)
[]
I dislike printers that have the heads separate of the cartridges. I
want new heads when I put in new cartridges. I print maybe once per


I'm in two minds about that: I know what you mean, but it does tend to
make the cartridges more expensive.

At least one make - I think it was Xerox - used to have a removable head
that itself had removable tanks; that was the best of both worlds - you
normally just replaced the inner tank, but could replace the outer
container (which included the head) when necessary. I very much doubt
any make/model still has that arrangement, though I'd like to be
pleasantly surprised.
[]
formulation or pay royalty to use someone else's. "printer ink must be
formulated to withstand heating to 300 degrees, vaporization, and being
squirted at 30 miles per hour, at a rate of 36,000 drops per second,
through a nozzle one third the size of a human hair. After all that it
must dry almost instantly on the paper. (statement by HP). Another
factor is archival quality: how well the ink will last on the paper.
Ink is the other "black gold".


There are also the two ways of squirting the ink: piezoelectric and
thermal. Piezo uses tiny crystals in the head - I don't think it
involves heating at all, though I wouldn't be surprised if they _get_ at
least warm; in thermal, the heads actually contain tiny resistors
(heaters) that boil a bubble in the actual ink itself, the pressure of
which forces the ink out. I am pretty certain that at one time, EPSON
were the only ones using the piezo method (I think they had a patent on
it); I don't know if that is still the case. The piezo heads are more
expensive to make, so are usually part of the printer. If you have one
of the resistive types of printer where the heads _are_ part of (and
thus replaced with) the cartridge, you can experiment with refilling
without too much concern, as if all else fails you just replace the
cartridge (and thus head) as you would have done anyway; for piezo
printers, you have to be more careful about using dubious ink, as if
things go wrong you're stuck with replacing part of the printer.

(For those wondering: piezoelectric materials are materials that
actually change shape if you apply electricity to them, or generate
electricity if you squeeze them; they used to have two common uses -
microphones [and record-player cartridges], where the
squeeze-to-make-electricity was used; and quartz [mainly] crystals,
where both properties are used in an oscillator circuit to make
something that works at a precise frequency related to the mechanical
dimensions of the piece of quartz. Now piezo printers are another
widespread use of these materials; you can also get desk fans that use
them, instead of a motor, but such are more a novelty than a widespread
use.)

For inkjet printing, I've come across CISS - continuous ink supply
systems; these use a set of four big bottles that stand beside the
printer, feeding four tiny pipes that go to dummy cartridges (which
presumably have some sort of electronics that keep the printer and/or
driver software happy). I presume there must be _some_ snag with these,
as I've rarely seen them in use - the cynic in me thinks it's subject to
the continuing arms race between the manufacturers over the
chips/firmware in the cartridges, but I suppose there could be practical
reasons too. I once - probably ten or more years ago! - saw such a
system operating at a computer fair: the owner had left the printer
running, churning out high-density colour pictures, unattended, in a way
nobody would ever have done with cartridges. _Maybe_ large-quantity
users just all go to colour laser (which produces better, and certainly
more durable, output anyway - just tends to be a more expensive [both to
buy and to maintain] printer).
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

Some cause happiness wherever they go; others, whenever they go. - Oscar Wilde
  #12  
Old June 4th 17, 07:39 AM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
micky
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 435
Default Printers survive 83 alone

In comp.periphs.printers, on Sat, 3 Jun 2017 22:46:10 +0100, "J. P.
Gilliver (John)" wrote:


In message , micky
writes:
In alt.comp.os.windows-10, on Sat, 3 Jun 2017 18:17:24 +0100, "J. P.
Gilliver (John)" wrote:

[]
_Some_ printers, if you leave them powered, will start up, and clean the
heads, at intervals - I think some of them once a day; people have come
back after a _long_ time away and found that the printer has used up a
complete set of cartridges doing this. Are you sure yours didn't just do
that?


No, not sure at all! Wasn't even saying otherwise. I didnt' think of
that, but that's probably it.

I don't like it doing that once a day. Once a week or once every two or
three weeks would be often enough, I would think. But it was better to
do it however often than while I was away for 80 days than to have to
buy a new printer.


BTW, was supposed to be titled Printers survive 83 days alone.

The "once a day" was just off the top of my head; I don't know if any do


Okay, thanks. I have to leave the printer plugged in. For a
while the computer was in the basement and the pritner on the second
floor, but even now it's in the next room. Too much trouble to get up
and plug it in. But since I've been using the really cheap ink, the ink
used in periodic cleaning** isn't a concern. I'll see how long my luck
lasts with the really cheap ink.

**It may still be annoying if I don't print for a month and I have to
replace a carttridge that is empty anyhow.

it that often. But I think I did have one printer that disconcertingly
woke up and did something occasionally, if you left the power connected.
[]



---
This email has been checked for viruses by AVG.
http://www.avg.com

  #13  
Old June 10th 17, 06:30 AM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Lucifer Morningstar[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Printers survive 83 alone

On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 11:03:42 +1200, Frank Williams
wrote:

On Sat, 3 Jun 2017 11:42:35 -0400, Alek wrote:

micky wrote on 3/6/2017 11:03 AM:
I might have posted here 3 months ago looking for help on how to
schedule a print job for every month I was gone, so my inkjet printer
heads wouldn't dry out. I spend over an hour the night before I left
trying to write a bat file that woudl do this, but I failed^^.

So I was very happy when I returned, printed a test pattern I'd
downloaded 3 months ago, and it came out just about perfect.

All the more strange since the black and yellow? heads on one of them
had dried out in February and I had to soak them in alcohol with a paper
towel slipped under the heads. (The process worked well. Details on
request).


Requesting details, please.



To stop your print heads from drying out make sure that the printer is
OFF, not at the Wall at the printer, as this caps the pint heads.

I brought a Epson R390 recently, had been stored for 2 years, replaced a
faulty cartridge that was locking up the printer, the printer prints OK
after 2 year in storage.

Having the printer turned on causes the print heads to dry out, as they
are not capped.


I was given a nice ink jet printer with five ink cartridges.
It had been stored so long even the unopened cartridges were useless.

I suppose a laser printer could be stored forever due to not having
any ink, or could the drum or toner be damaged?
Can the toner absorb moisture? I just switched on my Brother Laser
printer and the toner light is flashing even though it printed a test
page OK and it shows 50% toner remaining. The weather has been
very damp lately.
  #14  
Old June 10th 17, 07:15 AM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Lucifer Morningstar[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Printers survive 83 alone

On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:30:36 +1000, Lucifer Morningstar
wrote:

On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 11:03:42 +1200, Frank Williams
wrote:

On Sat, 3 Jun 2017 11:42:35 -0400, Alek wrote:

micky wrote on 3/6/2017 11:03 AM:
I might have posted here 3 months ago looking for help on how to
schedule a print job for every month I was gone, so my inkjet printer
heads wouldn't dry out. I spend over an hour the night before I left
trying to write a bat file that woudl do this, but I failed^^.

So I was very happy when I returned, printed a test pattern I'd
downloaded 3 months ago, and it came out just about perfect.

All the more strange since the black and yellow? heads on one of them
had dried out in February and I had to soak them in alcohol with a paper
towel slipped under the heads. (The process worked well. Details on
request).

Requesting details, please.



To stop your print heads from drying out make sure that the printer is
OFF, not at the Wall at the printer, as this caps the pint heads.

I brought a Epson R390 recently, had been stored for 2 years, replaced a
faulty cartridge that was locking up the printer, the printer prints OK
after 2 year in storage.

Having the printer turned on causes the print heads to dry out, as they
are not capped.


I was given a nice ink jet printer with five ink cartridges.
It had been stored so long even the unopened cartridges were useless.

I suppose a laser printer could be stored forever due to not having
any ink, or could the drum or toner be damaged?
Can the toner absorb moisture? I just switched on my Brother Laser
printer and the toner light is flashing even though it printed a test
page OK and it shows 50% toner remaining. The weather has been
very damp lately.


Update. The toner light has gone out presumably due to the toner
drying out.
  #15  
Old June 10th 17, 03:46 PM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 762
Default Printers survive 83 alone

Lucifer Morningstar wrote:
On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:30:36 +1000, Lucifer Morningstar
wrote:

On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 11:03:42 +1200, Frank Williams
wrote:

On Sat, 3 Jun 2017 11:42:35 -0400, Alek wrote:

micky wrote on 3/6/2017 11:03 AM:
I might have posted here 3 months ago looking for help on how to
schedule a print job for every month I was gone, so my inkjet printer
heads wouldn't dry out. I spend over an hour the night before I left
trying to write a bat file that woudl do this, but I failed^^.

So I was very happy when I returned, printed a test pattern I'd
downloaded 3 months ago, and it came out just about perfect.

All the more strange since the black and yellow? heads on one of them
had dried out in February and I had to soak them in alcohol with a paper
towel slipped under the heads. (The process worked well. Details on
request).
Requesting details, please.

To stop your print heads from drying out make sure that the printer is
OFF, not at the Wall at the printer, as this caps the pint heads.

I brought a Epson R390 recently, had been stored for 2 years, replaced a
faulty cartridge that was locking up the printer, the printer prints OK
after 2 year in storage.

Having the printer turned on causes the print heads to dry out, as they
are not capped.

I was given a nice ink jet printer with five ink cartridges.
It had been stored so long even the unopened cartridges were useless.

I suppose a laser printer could be stored forever due to not having
any ink, or could the drum or toner be damaged?
Can the toner absorb moisture? I just switched on my Brother Laser
printer and the toner light is flashing even though it printed a test
page OK and it shows 50% toner remaining. The weather has been
very damp lately.


Update. The toner light has gone out presumably due to the toner
drying out.


******* begin quote *******
a. Do not take a new toner cartridge out of the protective bag
until it is ready to be used.

b. When you take the toner cartridge out of the printer for
servicing the printer or other purposes, place the toner cartridge
into the original protective bag, or wrap it with a thick cloth
immediately. [Light-sensitive belt...]

c. Do not place it vertically or upside-down. Store the toner cartridge
in the same orientation as when installed in the printer. [Toner leakage...]

d. Do not store the toner cartridge in a place exposed to direct sunlight.
[Light-sensitive belt...]

e. Do not store cartridges in a hot or humid place, or a place where the
temperature and humidity can change significantly.

Storing environment temperatu 0 to 35C (32 to 95F) --- [pretty low temp limit!!!]
Storing humidity range: 35 to 85 % RH (no condensation)

f. Do not store the toner cartridge in a place where corrosive gases,
such as ammonia, are generated, or where a considerable amount of salt
is contained in the air, or where there is a lot of dust.
[So no lasers at the seashore.]
******* end quote *******

The 85% RH is pretty generous, the temperature range, not so much.

You can see in some of the text in this patent, which direction
the design of toner is headed in. According to this, they're trying
to push toner down to lower-temperature fusing, which may account
for the low storage temperature in the above quoted text.

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2017/0131652.html

The patent content helps fill in some of the less-defined
details in this article.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toner

While the outside layer of the toner particle may be
the same as in previous generations, the composition
can be quite a bit more complex. Maybe it's the color
toner that has all the technical innovation ?

Paul

  #16  
Old June 10th 17, 04:08 PM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
J. P. Gilliver (John)[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 24
Default Printers survive 83 alone

In message , Paul
writes:
Lucifer Morningstar wrote:
On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:30:36 +1000, Lucifer Morningstar
wrote:

[]
I suppose a laser printer could be stored forever due to not having
any ink, or could the drum or toner be damaged?
Can the toner absorb moisture? I just switched on my Brother Laser
printer and the toner light is flashing even though it printed a test
page OK and it shows 50% toner remaining. The weather has been
very damp lately.

Update. The toner light has gone out presumably due to the toner
drying out.


******* begin quote *******

[]
e. Do not store cartridges in a hot or humid place, or a place where the
temperature and humidity can change significantly.

Storing environment temperatu 0 to 35C (32 to 95F) ---
[pretty low temp limit!!!]
Storing humidity range: 35 to 85 % RH (no condensation)

[]
The 85% RH is pretty generous, the temperature range, not so much.

[]
Might be low for you: in most of England, we hardly ever see
temperatures that high, except perhaps for a few days in July and
August; I _think_ I'm right in saying we don't see 35 at all most years!
(28.0C [82.4F] here now after sunny all day so far, and I'm in Kent.)

I suppose a store cupboard in an uncooled room could get well above
that.
--
J. P. Gilliver. UMRA: 1960/1985 MB++G()AL-IS-Ch++(p)[email protected]+H+Sh0!:`)DNAf

age. fac ut gaudeam.
  #17  
Old June 11th 17, 01:42 AM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Lucifer Morningstar[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 6
Default Printers survive 83 alone

On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 10:46:15 -0400, Paul
wrote:

Lucifer Morningstar wrote:
On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:30:36 +1000, Lucifer Morningstar
wrote:

On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 11:03:42 +1200, Frank Williams
wrote:

On Sat, 3 Jun 2017 11:42:35 -0400, Alek wrote:

micky wrote on 3/6/2017 11:03 AM:
I might have posted here 3 months ago looking for help on how to
schedule a print job for every month I was gone, so my inkjet printer
heads wouldn't dry out. I spend over an hour the night before I left
trying to write a bat file that woudl do this, but I failed^^.

So I was very happy when I returned, printed a test pattern I'd
downloaded 3 months ago, and it came out just about perfect.

All the more strange since the black and yellow? heads on one of them
had dried out in February and I had to soak them in alcohol with a paper
towel slipped under the heads. (The process worked well. Details on
request).
Requesting details, please.

To stop your print heads from drying out make sure that the printer is
OFF, not at the Wall at the printer, as this caps the pint heads.

I brought a Epson R390 recently, had been stored for 2 years, replaced a
faulty cartridge that was locking up the printer, the printer prints OK
after 2 year in storage.

Having the printer turned on causes the print heads to dry out, as they
are not capped.
I was given a nice ink jet printer with five ink cartridges.
It had been stored so long even the unopened cartridges were useless.

I suppose a laser printer could be stored forever due to not having
any ink, or could the drum or toner be damaged?
Can the toner absorb moisture? I just switched on my Brother Laser
printer and the toner light is flashing even though it printed a test
page OK and it shows 50% toner remaining. The weather has been
very damp lately.


Update. The toner light has gone out presumably due to the toner
drying out.


******* begin quote *******
a. Do not take a new toner cartridge out of the protective bag
until it is ready to be used.

b. When you take the toner cartridge out of the printer for
servicing the printer or other purposes, place the toner cartridge
into the original protective bag, or wrap it with a thick cloth
immediately. [Light-sensitive belt...]

c. Do not place it vertically or upside-down. Store the toner cartridge
in the same orientation as when installed in the printer. [Toner leakage...]

d. Do not store the toner cartridge in a place exposed to direct sunlight.
[Light-sensitive belt...]

e. Do not store cartridges in a hot or humid place, or a place where the
temperature and humidity can change significantly.

Storing environment temperatu 0 to 35C (32 to 95F) --- [pretty low temp limit!!!]
Storing humidity range: 35 to 85 % RH (no condensation)

f. Do not store the toner cartridge in a place where corrosive gases,
such as ammonia, are generated, or where a considerable amount of salt
is contained in the air, or where there is a lot of dust.
[So no lasers at the seashore.]
******* end quote *******

The 85% RH is pretty generous, the temperature range, not so much.

You can see in some of the text in this patent, which direction
the design of toner is headed in. According to this, they're trying
to push toner down to lower-temperature fusing, which may account
for the low storage temperature in the above quoted text.

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2017/0131652.html

The patent content helps fill in some of the less-defined
details in this article.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toner

While the outside layer of the toner particle may be
the same as in previous generations, the composition
can be quite a bit more complex. Maybe it's the color
toner that has all the technical innovation ?

Paul


Is it OK if the toner light on my Brother monochrome laser
printer flashes for a short while and should I wait for the
toner light to go out before printing?
  #18  
Old June 11th 17, 05:35 AM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 762
Default Printers survive 83 alone

Lucifer Morningstar wrote:
On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 10:46:15 -0400, Paul
wrote:

Lucifer Morningstar wrote:
On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:30:36 +1000, Lucifer Morningstar
wrote:

On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 11:03:42 +1200, Frank Williams
wrote:

On Sat, 3 Jun 2017 11:42:35 -0400, Alek wrote:

micky wrote on 3/6/2017 11:03 AM:
I might have posted here 3 months ago looking for help on how to
schedule a print job for every month I was gone, so my inkjet printer
heads wouldn't dry out. I spend over an hour the night before I left
trying to write a bat file that woudl do this, but I failed^^.

So I was very happy when I returned, printed a test pattern I'd
downloaded 3 months ago, and it came out just about perfect.

All the more strange since the black and yellow? heads on one of them
had dried out in February and I had to soak them in alcohol with a paper
towel slipped under the heads. (The process worked well. Details on
request).
Requesting details, please.
To stop your print heads from drying out make sure that the printer is
OFF, not at the Wall at the printer, as this caps the pint heads.

I brought a Epson R390 recently, had been stored for 2 years, replaced a
faulty cartridge that was locking up the printer, the printer prints OK
after 2 year in storage.

Having the printer turned on causes the print heads to dry out, as they
are not capped.
I was given a nice ink jet printer with five ink cartridges.
It had been stored so long even the unopened cartridges were useless.

I suppose a laser printer could be stored forever due to not having
any ink, or could the drum or toner be damaged?
Can the toner absorb moisture? I just switched on my Brother Laser
printer and the toner light is flashing even though it printed a test
page OK and it shows 50% toner remaining. The weather has been
very damp lately.
Update. The toner light has gone out presumably due to the toner
drying out.

******* begin quote *******
a. Do not take a new toner cartridge out of the protective bag
until it is ready to be used.

b. When you take the toner cartridge out of the printer for
servicing the printer or other purposes, place the toner cartridge
into the original protective bag, or wrap it with a thick cloth
immediately. [Light-sensitive belt...]

c. Do not place it vertically or upside-down. Store the toner cartridge
in the same orientation as when installed in the printer. [Toner leakage...]

d. Do not store the toner cartridge in a place exposed to direct sunlight.
[Light-sensitive belt...]

e. Do not store cartridges in a hot or humid place, or a place where the
temperature and humidity can change significantly.

Storing environment temperatu 0 to 35C (32 to 95F) --- [pretty low temp limit!!!]
Storing humidity range: 35 to 85 % RH (no condensation)

f. Do not store the toner cartridge in a place where corrosive gases,
such as ammonia, are generated, or where a considerable amount of salt
is contained in the air, or where there is a lot of dust.
[So no lasers at the seashore.]
******* end quote *******

The 85% RH is pretty generous, the temperature range, not so much.

You can see in some of the text in this patent, which direction
the design of toner is headed in. According to this, they're trying
to push toner down to lower-temperature fusing, which may account
for the low storage temperature in the above quoted text.

http://www.freepatentsonline.com/y2017/0131652.html

The patent content helps fill in some of the less-defined
details in this article.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toner

While the outside layer of the toner particle may be
the same as in previous generations, the composition
can be quite a bit more complex. Maybe it's the color
toner that has all the technical innovation ?

Paul


Is it OK if the toner light on my Brother monochrome laser
printer flashes for a short while and should I wait for the
toner light to go out before printing?


The light comes on for a reason.

Does it have a feed mechanism or agitation ?

We used to pull the cartridge out of some of the equipment
at work, and *gently* tilt from side to side, to get the
last drop out of it. If you were careless, you got a
bit dirty :-) On that gear, the toner light was likely to
come on and stay on. Unless you performed the ceremony.

Your worst fear, you see, was going to the stock cabinet,
and not finding a replacement toner waiting for you. I
think Santa Claus used to bring them, because I could
never see anybody re-fill the cabinet.

When you use the unit for a while, you tend to develop a
feel for the "feeding habit" of the unit. Is the behavior
you saw, something that only appeared after the high humidity
interval ? Or has it always been a bit of a sluggard, and
enters the "I need toner" state, when all it needed to
do was wait a bit ? Not even the most detailed service
manual, will admit "the design is twitchy", but the users
soon figure that out :-)

With my ink jet, I still haven't developed a model of
what it's doing. There will be LED flashing, grinding,
carriage movement, and I haven't been able to
"count" all the actions and figure out "yes, after
39 seconds, it'll be ready". So the ink jets take the
cake for randomness. Just when you think it's ready,
more "carriage movement" and cleaning noises will come
out of the thing again. I think the unit waits until
you speak an expletive, before it stops.

Paul
  #19  
Old June 11th 17, 11:29 AM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Kerr Mudd-John
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Printers survive 83 alone

On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 16:08:53 +0100, J. P. Gilliver (John) wrote:

In message , Paul
writes:
Lucifer Morningstar wrote:
On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:30:36 +1000, Lucifer Morningstar
wrote:

[]
I suppose a laser printer could be stored forever due to not having
any ink, or could the drum or toner be damaged?
Can the toner absorb moisture? I just switched on my Brother Laser
printer and the toner light is flashing even though it printed a test
page OK and it shows 50% toner remaining. The weather has been
very damp lately.
Update. The toner light has gone out presumably due to the toner
drying out.


******* begin quote *******

[]
e. Do not store cartridges in a hot or humid place, or a place where the
temperature and humidity can change significantly.

Storing environment temperatu 0 to 35C (32 to 95F) ---
[pretty low temp limit!!!]
Storing humidity range: 35 to 85 % RH (no condensation)

[]
The 85% RH is pretty generous, the temperature range, not so much.

[]
Might be low for you: in most of England, we hardly ever see
temperatures that high, except perhaps for a few days in July and
August; I _think_ I'm right in saying we don't see 35 at all most years!
(28.0C [82.4F] here now after sunny all day so far, and I'm in Kent.)


Britain has never (well whilst the Met Office has been recording it) had 40C
2003 record (in your area!) down the page he
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faversham



I suppose a store cupboard in an uncooled room could get well above
that.



--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug
  #20  
Old June 11th 17, 12:23 PM posted to comp.periphs.printers,microsoft.public.windowsxp.general,alt.comp.os.windows-10
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 762
Default Printers survive 83 alone

Kerr Mudd-John wrote:
On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 16:08:53 +0100, J. P. Gilliver (John)
wrote:

In message , Paul
writes:
Lucifer Morningstar wrote:
On Sat, 10 Jun 2017 15:30:36 +1000, Lucifer Morningstar
wrote:

[]
I suppose a laser printer could be stored forever due to not having
any ink, or could the drum or toner be damaged?
Can the toner absorb moisture? I just switched on my Brother Laser
printer and the toner light is flashing even though it printed a test
page OK and it shows 50% toner remaining. The weather has been
very damp lately.
Update. The toner light has gone out presumably due to the toner
drying out.

******* begin quote *******

[]
e. Do not store cartridges in a hot or humid place, or a place where the
temperature and humidity can change significantly.

Storing environment temperatu 0 to 35C (32 to 95F) ---
[pretty low temp limit!!!]
Storing humidity range: 35 to 85 % RH (no condensation)

[]
The 85% RH is pretty generous, the temperature range, not so much.

[]
Might be low for you: in most of England, we hardly ever see
temperatures that high, except perhaps for a few days in July and
August; I _think_ I'm right in saying we don't see 35 at all most years!
(28.0C [82.4F] here now after sunny all day so far, and I'm in Kent.)


Britain has never (well whilst the Met Office has been recording it) had
40C
2003 record (in your area!) down the page he
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Faversham



I suppose a store cupboard in an uncooled room could get well above
that.


It's the temperature in the cupboard that counts.

Old houses have pretty good solar gain on a cloudless
summer day.

And 35C is two degrees short of human blood temperature, to
put it in perspective. You can't even go to sleep at night,
hugging your toner cartridge. It might get too warm.

Paul
 




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