A Computer hardware and components forum. ComputerBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » ComputerBanter.com forum » General Hardware & Peripherals » Storage (alt)
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Multi-actuator hard drives from Seagate



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 20th 17, 02:38 AM posted to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Percival P. Cassidy
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 177
Default Multi-actuator hard drives from Seagate


http://www.tomshardware.com/news/hdd...ate,36132.html
  #2  
Old December 20th 17, 03:35 AM posted to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,210
Default Multi-actuator hard drives from Seagate

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/hdd...ate,36132.html


Defragmenters will have to adopt new algorithms so they position
sequential data not in successive clusters within the same track on the
same platter but jigsawing the data across multiple platters. So one
head can read one cluster of data while a head on the other arm can be
reading the next logically sequential cluster of data in building up the
data stream.

So they split the arm into 2 arms to increase access speed. Still
limited to just 2 heads at a time. Maybe they'll eventually use
separate arms for each platter. I suspect the noise level will go up.
Instead of one arm making chunking noise, now there will be 2, then 4,
then 8, then 16. Wonder how much more the multi-arm drives will vibrate
which will require more insulating to dampen the vibration transmitted
to the cage and then to the case.
  #3  
Old December 20th 17, 05:36 AM posted to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Mark Perkins
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 69
Default Multi-actuator hard drives from Seagate

On Tue, 19 Dec 2017 20:35:33 -0600, VanguardLH wrote:

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/hdd...ate,36132.html


Defragmenters will have to adopt new algorithms so they position
sequential data not in successive clusters within the same track on the
same platter but jigsawing the data across multiple platters. So one
head can read one cluster of data while a head on the other arm can be
reading the next logically sequential cluster of data in building up the
data stream.


I didn't get that impression from the article.

From the blog post:
The host computer can treat a single Dual Actuator drive as if it were
two separate drives. This means the host computer can ask a single
high-capacity drive to retrieve two different data requests
simultaneously delivering data up to twice as fast compared with a
single-actuator drive.
/blog

The host computer is expected to ask the drive to do two things at once,
but I don't see that as expecting the drive to read interleaved data and
assemble it on the fly. Instead, it sounds more like the following:

read two files simultaneously
write two files simultaneously
write one file while reading another



Besides, I'm not worried about defragging. That went out of fashion many
years ago.

  #4  
Old December 20th 17, 05:54 AM posted to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,210
Default Multi-actuator hard drives from Seagate

Mark Perkins wrote:

On Tue, 19 Dec 2017 20:35:33 -0600, VanguardLH wrote:

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/hdd...ate,36132.html


Defragmenters will have to adopt new algorithms so they position
sequential data not in successive clusters within the same track on the
same platter but jigsawing the data across multiple platters. So one
head can read one cluster of data while a head on the other arm can be
reading the next logically sequential cluster of data in building up the
data stream.


I didn't get that impression from the article.

From the blog post:
The host computer can treat a single Dual Actuator drive as if it were
two separate drives. This means the host computer can ask a single
high-capacity drive to retrieve two different data requests
simultaneously delivering data up to twice as fast compared with a
single-actuator drive.
/blog

The host computer is expected to ask the drive to do two things at once,
but I don't see that as expecting the drive to read interleaved data and
assemble it on the fly. Instead, it sounds more like the following:

read two files simultaneously
write two files simultaneously
write one file while reading another

Besides, I'm not worried about defragging. That went out of fashion many
years ago.


With your interpretation, there would be nothing faster about reading or
writing *a* file. Not much point in wasting the money on this drive
technology.
  #5  
Old December 20th 17, 06:04 AM posted to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
Mark Perkins
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 69
Default Multi-actuator hard drives from Seagate

On Tue, 19 Dec 2017 22:54:19 -0600, VanguardLH wrote:

Mark Perkins wrote:

On Tue, 19 Dec 2017 20:35:33 -0600, VanguardLH wrote:

Percival P. Cassidy wrote:

http://www.tomshardware.com/news/hdd...ate,36132.html

Defragmenters will have to adopt new algorithms so they position
sequential data not in successive clusters within the same track on the
same platter but jigsawing the data across multiple platters. So one
head can read one cluster of data while a head on the other arm can be
reading the next logically sequential cluster of data in building up the
data stream.


I didn't get that impression from the article.

From the blog post:
The host computer can treat a single Dual Actuator drive as if it were
two separate drives. This means the host computer can ask a single
high-capacity drive to retrieve two different data requests
simultaneously delivering data up to twice as fast compared with a
single-actuator drive.
/blog

The host computer is expected to ask the drive to do two things at once,
but I don't see that as expecting the drive to read interleaved data and
assemble it on the fly. Instead, it sounds more like the following:

read two files simultaneously
write two files simultaneously
write one file while reading another

Besides, I'm not worried about defragging. That went out of fashion many
years ago.


With your interpretation, there would be nothing faster about reading or
writing *a* file. Not much point in wasting the money on this drive
technology.


Statistically, when is a modern computer reading or writing a single
file? Almost never, I'd say. So, yes, I think this will be significantly
faster, at least in theory. Who knows, it may move the bottleneck
somewhere else.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Seagate offers low-cost 8TB hard drives [email protected] Storage (alt) 4 January 2nd 15 06:12 AM
massive props to Seagate hard drives Todd H. Storage (alt) 0 October 28th 06 10:59 PM
Building A System Around Seagate Hard Drives Darren Harris Storage (alt) 2 January 11th 04 03:13 AM
Qty (30) Seagate ST34572W 4GB Hard Drives for Sale Jay Willis General Hardware 0 November 4th 03 05:28 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:19 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 ComputerBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.