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Replacement hard disk for Lenovo G50-45 model 80E30181US



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 7th 17, 03:52 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware
t
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 72
Default Replacement hard disk for Lenovo G50-45 model 80E30181US

I looked at the specs
http://psref.lenovo.com/syspool/Sys/...ifications.pdf

and it mentions SSHD with 8GB NAND flash memory.


1. Will any 2.5inch SSD work with the Lenovo 50-45 model 80E30181US laptop?

2. Is any brand like Western Digital better than others like Samsung for
SSDs or they are pretty much the same quality?

3. Do I need the mount bundle shown at with the SSD
https://www.amazon.com/Samsung-2-5-I.../dp/B00OAJ412U

Any suggestions would be appreciated.
  #2  
Old November 7th 17, 10:27 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 762
Default Replacement hard disk for Lenovo G50-45 model 80E30181US

t wrote:
I looked at the specs
http://psref.lenovo.com/syspool/Sys/...ifications.pdf


and it mentions SSHD with 8GB NAND flash memory.


1. Will any 2.5inch SSD work with the Lenovo 50-45 model 80E30181US laptop?

2. Is any brand like Western Digital better than others like Samsung for
SSDs or they are pretty much the same quality?

3. Do I need the mount bundle shown at with the SSD
https://www.amazon.com/Samsung-2-5-I.../dp/B00OAJ412U


Any suggestions would be appreciated.


The 850 EVO is TLC (V-NAND). MLC like V-NAND would be better.
One reason it's better, is TLC writes in two stages, and can
be using an SLC-like cache area for the original write, followed
by a slower write to actual TLC cells later. When an MLC drive
writes, it writes directly to MLC. There are some subtle differences
with how TLC works in practice. You're welcome at this point,
to stick your fingers in your ears and sing "LaLaLa".

http://techreport.com/review/27464/s...drive-reviewed

Of course, the drive bay in that machine might be SATA II,
which means the SSD won't necessarily bench its best
numbers while in the laptop. It's probably better
not to benchmark it anyway - as looking at the
results will only make you angry :-) I find myself
quite annoyed, when looking at the wide variation
in results. This only matters if you run an "SSD-only"
shop and notice your drive-to-drive performance is
sucky. A single-drive in a machine, nobody is going
to know.

*******

You want to stay within the power footprint of the drive bay. Your
spec makes no mention of what limits the bay might have. It doesn't
even tease us with a "5400 RPM only" type spec, which is normally
a hint the drive bay gets hot.

SSDs with Sandforce controllers, can have high peak power (due to the
controller compressing the data before writing it). Lots of drives
do compression, which is why the benchmarks vary when writing a
large file full of zeros, versus a large file filled with
"random" uncompressible data. In my case, I measured the
actual power while doing operations on it - the foot print on
mine is under 2.5W so it's safe for me to run it on a USB2
enclosure. The power spec printed on the tin, is frequently
useless for the job.

I recommend finding a review site that has measured the
power under benchmark conditions, just so you have some
idea how much hotter than a hard drive it can get. My SSD
never gets hot to the touch, but there's airflow inside
the mid-tower case, and by the time I get the side off
the case, I might not be getting good feedback. Some
flash drives now use metal cases, and use a sil-pad to
conduct heat from internal chips, to the metal. Maybe
the controller chip gets that treatment, or all the
chips do.

*******

There's nothing in the spec that hints at a special requirement.
There is no mention of an accelerometer in the hard drive, to
make the device "drop-resistant". The publish date of the
document, is modern enough that SSD drives as an option should
have been mentioned. I don't know if this is an attempt at a
"subtle power dig" or not.

*******

In effect, as the "engineer" on this job, your job is to
make sure the power level of the new storage solution,
is not violating some (undocumented) power limits in the
design. Some Sandforce drives, might have power spikes
as high as seven watts. Lots of other drives, the power
is low enough, you might safely run them on a USB adapter.
The "devsleep" listing on the tin, while a nice-to-have
spec when idle in the desktop, tells you nothing about
making the drive bay too hot. A little heat doesn't
kill Flash - high temps tend to "anneal" damage better,
but high temps might also shorten retention time or
something (might be more of an issue near end of
life). You can probably find a tech article discussing
the trade-offs.

The article you quoted, has load power, and the
250GB SSD drive is 1.9W. You can compare that to a 2.5" hard
drive (a wd10spzx is 1.5W at 5400RPM, during read or
write, as a comparison, while a wd10jplx is 1.8-2W at
7200RPM). Your SSD is in the same ballpark, on a write.

And there are web sites that measure the power, so
you should be able to get some actual data on them,
somewhere.

On my laptop, my battery life was cut in half when
I installed an SSD - but I was also switching from
Win7 to Win10, which completely invalidates the
results :-) With Win10, the fan on the laptop actually
goes off, if the network cable is disconnected. The
battery life is strongly affected by whether Win10
can "do its maintenance thing" and beat the ****
out of the battery. I'm pretty sure the Win10 power
is actually lower than the Win7 power... as long
as the network cable stays disconnected. The
very definition of "useless". I didn't bother
doing any A/B testing with Win7 alone, which
would have been a more sensible thing to do.
It wasn't my intention to bench the thing,
and the only reason I mention it, is it was
affecting usability.

Paul
  #3  
Old December 4th 17, 02:21 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware
t
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 72
Default Replacement hard disk for Lenovo G50-45 model 80E30181US

On 11/7/2017 5:27 AM, Paul wrote:
t wrote:
I looked at the specs
http://psref.lenovo.com/syspool/Sys/...ifications.pdf


and it mentions SSHD with 8GB NAND flash memory.


1. Will any 2.5inch SSD work with the Lenovo 50-45 model 80E30181US
laptop?

2. Is any brand like Western Digital better than others like Samsung
for SSDs or they are pretty much the same quality?

3. Do I need the mount bundle shown at with the SSD
https://www.amazon.com/Samsung-2-5-I.../dp/B00OAJ412U


Any suggestions would be appreciated.


The 850 EVO is TLC (V-NAND). MLC like V-NAND would be better.
One reason it's better, is TLC writes in two stages, and can
be using an SLC-like cache area for the original write, followed
by a slower write to actual TLC cells later. When an MLC drive
writes, it writes directly to MLC. There are some subtle differences
with how TLC works in practice. You're welcome at this point,
to stick your fingers in your ears and sing "LaLaLa".

http://techreport.com/review/27464/s...drive-reviewed


Of course, the drive bay in that machine might be SATA II,
which means the SSD won't necessarily bench its best
numbers while in the laptop. It's probably better
not to benchmark it anyway - as looking at the
results will only make you angry :-) I find myself
quite annoyed, when looking at the wide variation
in results. This only matters if you run an "SSD-only"
shop and notice your drive-to-drive performance is
sucky. A single-drive in a machine, nobody is going
to know.

*******

You want to stay within the power footprint of the drive bay. Your
spec makes no mention of what limits the bay might have. It doesn't
even tease us with a "5400 RPM only" type spec, which is normally
a hint the drive bay gets hot.

SSDs with Sandforce controllers, can have high peak power (due to the
controller compressing the data before writing it). Lots of drives
do compression, which is why the benchmarks vary when writing a
large file full of zeros, versus a large file filled with
"random" uncompressible data. In my case, I measured the
actual power while doing operations on it - the foot print on
mine is under 2.5W so it's safe for me to run it on a USB2
enclosure. The power spec printed on the tin, is frequently
useless for the job.

I recommend finding a review site that has measured the
power under benchmark conditions, just so you have some
idea how much hotter than a hard drive it can get. My SSD
never gets hot to the touch, but there's airflow inside
the mid-tower case, and by the time I get the side off
the case, I might not be getting good feedback. Some
flash drives now use metal cases, and use a sil-pad to
conduct heat from internal chips, to the metal. Maybe
the controller chip gets that treatment, or all the
chips do.

*******

There's nothing in the spec that hints at a special requirement.
There is no mention of an accelerometer in the hard drive, to
make the device "drop-resistant". The publish date of the
document, is modern enough that SSD drives as an option should
have been mentioned. I don't know if this is an attempt at a
"subtle power dig" or not.

*******

In effect, as the "engineer" on this job, your job is to
make sure the power level of the new storage solution,
is not violating some (undocumented) power limits in the
design. Some Sandforce drives, might have power spikes
as high as seven watts. Lots of other drives, the power
is low enough, you might safely run them on a USB adapter.
The "devsleep" listing on the tin, while a nice-to-have
spec when idle in the desktop, tells you nothing about
making the drive bay too hot. A little heat doesn't
kill Flash - high temps tend to "anneal" damage better,
but high temps might also shorten retention time or
something (might be more of an issue near end of
life). You can probably find a tech article discussing
the trade-offs.

The article you quoted, has load power, and the
250GB SSD drive is 1.9W. You can compare that to a 2.5" hard
drive (a wd10spzx is 1.5W at 5400RPM, during read or
write, as a comparison, while a wd10jplx is 1.8-2W at
7200RPM). Your SSD is in the same ballpark, on a write.

And there are web sites that measure the power, so
you should be able to get some actual data on them,
somewhere.

On my laptop, my battery life was cut in half when
I installed an SSD - but I was also switching from
Win7 to Win10, which completely invalidates the
results :-) With Win10, the fan on the laptop actually
goes off, if the network cable is disconnected. The
battery life is strongly affected by whether Win10
can "do its maintenance thing" and beat the ****
out of the battery. I'm pretty sure the Win10 power
is actually lower than the Win7 power... as long
as the network cable stays disconnected. The
very definition of "useless". I didn't bother
doing any A/B testing with Win7 alone, which
would have been a more sensible thing to do.
It wasn't my intention to bench the thing,
and the only reason I mention it, is it was
affecting usability.

Paul


Thanks Paul,

This is very helpful. I appreciate your advice.
 




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