A Computer hardware and components forum. ComputerBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » ComputerBanter.com forum » General Hardware & Peripherals » Homebuilt PC's
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

another 1920x1200 LCD problem



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old December 5th 18, 11:25 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 163
Default another 1920x1200 LCD problem

I had a Samsung 2443 sitting in a cupboard for ages. I plugged it in to a
laptop using VGA cable, and screen is blank. If I shine a torch onto the
screen, I can see the image, meaning the backlight is shirking its duty.
However, if cable unplugged, you get the moving box telling you there is
no input, check cable. So the backlight is working.
I can't see anything in VGA pinout that would tell monitor to turn out
the backlight.
It works using the DVI for about 10 seconds, then backlight goes out,
but the power indicator LED stays blue.
  #2  
Old December 5th 18, 04:43 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 884
Default another 1920x1200 LCD problem

wrote:
I had a Samsung 2443 sitting in a cupboard for ages. I plugged it in to a
laptop using VGA cable, and screen is blank. If I shine a torch onto the
screen, I can see the image, meaning the backlight is shirking its duty.
However, if cable unplugged, you get the moving box telling you there is
no input, check cable. So the backlight is working.
I can't see anything in VGA pinout that would tell monitor to turn out
the backlight.
It works using the DVI for about 10 seconds, then backlight goes out,
but the power indicator LED stays blue.


https://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=36555

Here is a composite picture with some labels.

https://i.postimg.cc/P5dB8HxL/SAM244...adcaps-net.jpg

The IC in that picture, likely controls the drive to the
transformer. It could have an "intensity" input. The OSD
may have a control which sets the backlight level, and the
logic board would send a "signal" on one of the wires
to the power board, asking that IC to adjust the level.

To adjust level on a CCFL, you run the transformer at 25KHz
as usual, but you send "bursts of sine waves" at the tube.
This adjusts the duty cycle, while maintaining gas "ignition"
and conductance in the tube. Such a control method allows
a larger reduction in backlight intensity than the
old "adjustment knob" method used on much older equipment.
So while you might have concluded by looking at the circuit
"it's over-engineered", that IC is likely designed with
backlight modulation in mind. They could either send a
25KHz PWM intensity signal from the logic board, or
they could send a DC level from the logic board requesting
a particular level.

The CCFL tubes require an AC sine wave with no DC offset.
The 22pF caps are good conductors at 25KHz, and there is
little drop across them. One thing to remember - since the
coupling caps are 22pF, even the "foil" or "reflectors"
around the CCFL are part of the circuit. The foil and
reflectors have capacitance too, and are sometimes used
to enhance the electrical performance of the coupling.
There is a whole book written about the dos and don'ts
of placing stuff around CCFL tubes :-) Many companies
botch this detail when making equipment. Users also
screw things up when replacing CCFLs.

When you make adjustments in the OSD, the logic board
remembers that for next time, and when the monitor powers
up, the logic board will put the appropriate signal on
the one wire in the cable.

The above isn't entirely consistent with your symptoms,
because it seems the inverter and backlights work properly
when the OSD rectangle is displayed. And really, the driving
circuits do all the same things when drawing that, as is
done when the computer image is on the screen. The difference
is, the logic board draws slightly less power when there is
no DVI/VGA input. Implying that maybe the primary voltage
on the power board pops up a bit when the OSD-rectangle
is present, and collapses a tiny bit when the computer
image is drawn.

If you could see the OSD and adjust the intensity, you
might squeeze another couple weeks of operation from the
monitor. It's unlikely you can see it though, to make the
adjustment. The higher you set the intensity, the harder
that will be on those two bad solder joints.

Best guess,
Paul
  #3  
Old December 5th 18, 04:55 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,138
Default another 1920x1200 LCD problem

On Wed, 5 Dec 2018 02:25:18 -0800 (PST), wrote:

I had a Samsung 2443 sitting in a cupboard for ages. I plugged it in to a
laptop using VGA cable, and screen is blank. If I shine a torch onto the
screen, I can see the image, meaning the backlight is shirking its duty.
However, if cable unplugged, you get the moving box telling you there is
no input, check cable. So the backlight is working.
I can't see anything in VGA pinout that would tell monitor to turn out
the backlight.
It works using the DVI for about 10 seconds, then backlight goes out,
but the power indicator LED stays blue.


Faulty logic on a control board, possibly. Laid face down on a
blanket and disassembled from the back, those boards are sometimes on
Ebay. And there may not be much else in there besides the board,
screen, backing source, possible PWR PCB support module. My first
Syntax 32" broke in warranty - vertical lines traces generated across
25% of a motion display screen. Talked to them and somehow we got to
a point where they decided to send me replacement boards to effect my
repair. Didn't work after I swapped the control board. Same lines.
Called back and they said they had no idea in hell why support would
have customers doing their own repairs. Sent me the next-year's model
and it's being going for a couple decades.

I've also a Samsung SyncMaster 19" 940T that's older than that. It's
the Samsung that slides up a column from it's base to rotate 90-deg
for a page-mode wordprocessing display. Still works great from near
the end of CRTs and never saw a lot of use. 32" then became my
preferred desktop size.
  #4  
Old December 6th 18, 07:42 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 163
Default another 1920x1200 LCD problem

On Wednesday, December 5, 2018 at 11:43:35 PM UTC+8, Paul wrote:

https://www.badcaps.net/forum/showthread.php?t=36555

Here is a composite picture with some labels.

https://i.postimg.cc/P5dB8HxL/SAM244...adcaps-net.jpg

The IC in that picture, likely controls the drive to the
transformer. It could have an "intensity" input. The OSD
may have a control which sets the backlight level, and the
logic board would send a "signal" on one of the wires
to the power board, asking that IC to adjust the level.

To adjust level on a CCFL, you run the transformer at 25KHz
as usual, but you send "bursts of sine waves" at the tube.
This adjusts the duty cycle, while maintaining gas "ignition"
and conductance in the tube. Such a control method allows
a larger reduction in backlight intensity than the
old "adjustment knob" method used on much older equipment.
So while you might have concluded by looking at the circuit
"it's over-engineered", that IC is likely designed with
backlight modulation in mind. They could either send a
25KHz PWM intensity signal from the logic board, or
they could send a DC level from the logic board requesting
a particular level.

The CCFL tubes require an AC sine wave with no DC offset.
The 22pF caps are good conductors at 25KHz, and there is
little drop across them. One thing to remember - since the
coupling caps are 22pF, even the "foil" or "reflectors"
around the CCFL are part of the circuit. The foil and
reflectors have capacitance too, and are sometimes used
to enhance the electrical performance of the coupling.
There is a whole book written about the dos and don'ts
of placing stuff around CCFL tubes :-) Many companies
botch this detail when making equipment. Users also
screw things up when replacing CCFLs.

When you make adjustments in the OSD, the logic board
remembers that for next time, and when the monitor powers
up, the logic board will put the appropriate signal on
the one wire in the cable.

The above isn't entirely consistent with your symptoms,
because it seems the inverter and backlights work properly
when the OSD rectangle is displayed. And really, the driving
circuits do all the same things when drawing that, as is
done when the computer image is on the screen. The difference
is, the logic board draws slightly less power when there is
no DVI/VGA input. Implying that maybe the primary voltage
on the power board pops up a bit when the OSD-rectangle
is present, and collapses a tiny bit when the computer
image is drawn.

If you could see the OSD and adjust the intensity, you
might squeeze another couple weeks of operation from the
monitor. It's unlikely you can see it though, to make the
adjustment. The higher you set the intensity, the harder
that will be on those two bad solder joints.

Best guess,
Paul


thanks for that explanation. I assumed it would not last much longer.
This monitor will go to the recycling (junk)yard.
I've had quite a few monitors with totally dead backlights; this one seemed
an unusual failure.

 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
``Supports 1920x1200''? Ron Hardin Dell Computers 4 July 9th 07 05:19 AM
Inspiron WUXGA at 1920X1200 Jeff Berk Dell Computers 1 May 14th 05 04:02 PM
ATI AIW 1920x1200 Frank Ati Videocards 2 December 27th 04 04:28 PM
X800 Pro & 1920x1200 DVI Mike Fisher Ati Videocards 2 September 30th 04 11:43 PM
1920x1200 resolution from ATI 128 Pro II Paul Homebuilt PC's 2 September 3rd 04 10:25 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:54 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2018 ComputerBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.