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Power supply problem



 
 
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  #1  
Old June 25th 06, 04:18 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
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Default Power supply problem

Is there a chance that a faulty system(cpu,mb,ram) could damage a
working PS?

A friend has complained to me that his PC had shut down abruptly and he
couldn't power it on, so I went over there to have a looksee. When I
switched it on, the LED on his mb was shining, but no fans were
spinning, so I replaced his power supply with mine. The fan on the cpu
started to spin, but still no POST. Then there was trouble: my PS
started to make some noise + some burning smell, so I switched it off.
When I got home I've put back my PS in my box, and then the whole room
started to smell in the way we all know and adore. Hence the question
at the top.

  #2  
Old June 25th 06, 04:42 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
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Default Power supply problem

absolutely...especially cheapees...and i'm sorry to say. it may have taken
your rig with it.


wrote in message
ups.com...
Is there a chance that a faulty system(cpu,mb,ram) could damage a
working PS?

A friend has complained to me that his PC had shut down abruptly and he
couldn't power it on, so I went over there to have a looksee. When I
switched it on, the LED on his mb was shining, but no fans were
spinning, so I replaced his power supply with mine. The fan on the cpu
started to spin, but still no POST. Then there was trouble: my PS
started to make some noise + some burning smell, so I switched it off.
When I got home I've put back my PS in my box, and then the whole room
started to smell in the way we all know and adore. Hence the question
at the top.



  #3  
Old June 25th 06, 06:31 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
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Default Power supply problem

On 25 Jun 2006 08:18:39 -0700, wrote:

Is there a chance that a faulty system(cpu,mb,ram) could damage a
working PS?


With a properly designed power supply, no it should not
happen. With a poor PSU it may, due to lack of
safety/shutdown circuitry. What make and model was your
PSU?




A friend has complained to me that his PC had shut down abruptly and he
couldn't power it on, so I went over there to have a looksee.


First thing to do is unplug from AC for several minutes.
From here you can take two paths- if system is rather
valuable, pull the PSU for external testing so as to not
jeopardize the system any further. If invaluable, try to
turn system on again, preferribly having a multimeter hooked
up to the power leads to assess the voltages.

While the system was open it is good to do the usual
examination of cards, cables, connectors, and capacitors. A
failing capacitor realated shorting is not uncommon, or a
cascaded failure.

When I
switched it on, the LED on his mb was shining, but no fans were
spinning, so I replaced his power supply with mine.


If only focusing on two main components, PSU and
motherboard, we have already multiple possible scenarios.
Board was failing and poor PSU got damaged. PSU was failing
and (any) board was damaged. Either part was failing but
the other part was ok.

The other variable is all the other parts connected to the
motherboard and PSU. Thus, being thorough would mean
disconnecting all other parts, having just the motherboard
connected. "IF" that seems to work, and a multimeter
indicates voltages are ok, proceed to add back the CPU,
video (if not integrated video) and 1 memory module, at
which point you hope to get the system to POST by shorting
together the power-on pins on the motherboard with a metal
object. (That is, you had already disconnected the case
front panel connections and USB headers, etc, too.)

The fan on the cpu
started to spin, but still no POST. Then there was trouble: my PS
started to make some noise + some burning smell, so I switched it off.


At that point, since the system had been opened and "things"
done inside, it would be good to reexaming everything before
any further action, to be sure there weren't any cards out
of place, or cables, etc, possibly shorting out. Even then,
as mentioned previously a decent PSU should have turned off
and refused to start until the AC power had been
disconnected for several seconds. If there wasn't any other
extreme (obvious?) problem, it "could" be that your PSU
which died, was almost dead anyway or low enough quality
that it wasn't really suitable for use even though it had
been working (dangerously, a risk to YOUR system before
now).


When I got home I've put back my PS in my box, and then the whole room
started to smell in the way we all know and adore. Hence the question
at the top.



Hopefully only the PSU is gone. We could assume his system
has damaged your psu because your psu lacked the appropriate
design to turn itself off. We can now only hope your psu at
least had enough protection to turn off before damaging your
system.

So yes it seems what you suspect has happened but it is not
always what would happen in same situation (with a better
PSU).
  #4  
Old June 26th 06, 01:47 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
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Default Power supply problem

OK, now I've learned my lesson and bought a CHIEFTEC 400W
GPS-400AA-101A. But should I try and connect it to his PC?

  #5  
Old June 26th 06, 03:27 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
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Default Power supply problem

Short answer, no...

If his Mobo is running power to ground you will achieve the same
results... Tell him to start over.

-Randy

wrote:
OK, now I've learned my lesson and bought a CHIEFTEC 400W
GPS-400AA-101A. But should I try and connect it to his PC?


  #6  
Old June 26th 06, 06:20 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
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Default Power supply problem

On 26 Jun 2006 07:27:37 -0700, "Randella"
wrote:

Short answer, no...

If his Mobo is running power to ground you will achieve the same
results... Tell him to start over.



If it's shorting out (or suspected to be...) a simple
resistance check between the power pins (mainly the 3.3V,
5V, 5VSB and 12V) and ground should find this. If a part
later downstream from the rail voltages is causing this,
even then the PSU should shut off. I would try it before
concluding the motherboard was dead, although the odds are
good that it is.
  #7  
Old June 27th 06, 06:05 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
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Default Power supply problem

"kony" wrote in message
...
On 26 Jun 2006 07:27:37 -0700, "Randella"
wrote:

Short answer, no...

If his Mobo is running power to ground you will achieve the same
results... Tell him to start over.



If it's shorting out (or suspected to be...) a simple
resistance check between the power pins (mainly the 3.3V,
5V, 5VSB and 12V) and ground should find this. If a part
later downstream from the rail voltages is causing this,
even then the PSU should shut off. I would try it before
concluding the motherboard was dead, although the odds are
good that it is.


I think he was wondering if he should hook up the newly bought PSU to his
system.


George Hester
_________________________________

  #8  
Old June 27th 06, 06:57 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware,alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt,microsoft.public.windowsxp.hardware
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Default Power supply problem

On Tue, 27 Jun 2006 05:05:51 GMT, "George Hester"
wrote:


If it's shorting out (or suspected to be...) a simple
resistance check between the power pins (mainly the 3.3V,
5V, 5VSB and 12V) and ground should find this. If a part
later downstream from the rail voltages is causing this,
even then the PSU should shut off. I would try it before
concluding the motherboard was dead, although the odds are
good that it is.


I think he was wondering if he should hook up the newly bought PSU to his
system.


Yes, that is the idea I replied to.
 




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