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data encryption and data recovery?



 
 
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  #1  
Old February 22nd 06, 12:23 AM posted to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
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Default data encryption and data recovery?

In the future it appears most hdd's will be encrypted. However, the person
trying to attempt Do It Yourself data recovery is not likely to have the key
for the encryption.
I read the rate of theft on laptops a few weeks back, the encryption process
reflects the loss of data and the value of the data. But, the added security
is likely to end DIY
data recovery and DR by small business.

M$ Vista is slated for encryption.

"Microsoft has said Windows Vista has features that take advantage of TPM
chipset ...

TPM chipsets have been widely endorsed by both hardware and software
manufacturers to tighten the noose on piracy"

TPM is Trusted Platform Module. That article is at

http://www.networkworld.com/news/200...html?nlhtmn=02
20microsoftalert1


Seagate announced Full Disc Encryption and has a white paper on the topic at
their website. "No negative impact to the user", probably a true statement
until the user cannot access their data.
"in the event a data recovery service must hace access to the drive it can
be supplied", but what about the end user, I doubt Seagate will provide a
key to everyone who cannot access their hdd?

Comments appreciated.


  #2  
Old February 22nd 06, 12:40 AM posted to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
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Posts: n/a
Default data encryption and data recovery?

Noname wrote

In the future it appears most hdd's will be encrypted.


Dont believe it.

However, the person trying to attempt Do It Yourself data
recovery is not likely to have the key for the encryption.


Thats what the proper backups are for.

I read the rate of theft on laptops a few weeks back,
the encryption process reflects the loss of data and
the value of the data. But, the added security is likely
to end DIY data recovery and DR by small business.


How odd that it didnt with the ATA
standard protection for laptop hard drives.

M$ Vista is slated for encryption.


We'll see. And we'll see how many actually bother
with it even if that does happen. Most dont with the
ATA standard protection for hard drives in laptops.

"Microsoft has said Windows Vista has features
that take advantage of TPM chipset ...


TPM chipsets have been widely endorsed by both hardware
and software manufacturers to tighten the noose on piracy"


There's been endless claims along those lines in the past
that have turned out to be just plain mindlessly silly.

TPM is Trusted Platform Module. That article is at


http://www.networkworld.com/news/200...html?nlhtmn=02
20microsoftalert1


Yawn.

Seagate announced Full Disc Encryption and has a white paper
on the topic at their website. "No negative impact to the user",
probably a true statement until the user cannot access their data.


Thats what the proper backups are for.

"in the event a data recovery service must hace access to the drive
it can be supplied", but what about the end user, I doubt Seagate
will provide a key to everyone who cannot access their hdd?


Likely not, but thats what the proper backups are for.

Comments appreciated.



  #3  
Old February 22nd 06, 05:09 AM posted to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
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Posts: n/a
Default data encryption and data recovery?

Previously Noname wrote:

In the future it appears most hdd's will be encrypted.


That's a big assumption. Care to give any evidence?

However, the person trying to attempt Do It Yourself data recovery
is not likely to have the key for the encryption. I read the rate
of theft on laptops a few weeks back, the encryption process
reflects the loss of data and the value of the data. But, the added
security is likely to end DIY data recovery and DR by small
business.


No. Not on the sector layer. That is completely independent of
encryption.

M$ Vista is slated for encryption.
"Microsoft has said Windows Vista has features that take advantage
of TPM chipset ...
TPM chipsets have been widely endorsed by both hardware and software
manufacturers to tighten the noose on piracy"
TPM is Trusted Platform Module. That article is at
http://www.networkworld.com/news/200...html?nlhtmn=02
20microsoftalert1


Seagate announced Full Disc Encryption and has a white paper on the
topic at their website. "No negative impact to the user", probably a
true statement until the user cannot access their data. "in the
event a data recovery service must hace access to the drive it can
be supplied", but what about the end user, I doubt Seagate will
provide a key to everyone who cannot access their hdd?


You are confusing things he Data recovery not on a file, but on
a sector level is completely independent of any encryption done on
a higher layer. Data recovery on a file layer is possible as long
as the keys are available. Now TPM does not prevent the user from
giving out his or her keys to a data recovery outfit. True, it could
be done that way, bit there is absolutely no reason to do so. A
trusted OS does not need it. It would end any possibility to
do bulk-installations or backups. And the user can still access
the files anyways in normal operation when transparent decryption
is done.

TPM is not used to hide the keys for disk encryption from the user.
TPM is mainly intended at keeping the keys safe for the user (and
the user can get them out of the TPM modules) and more recently
admitted, for preventing the user to run an OS the TPM vendor does
not want to be run. Here we are in the area of DRM, where a trusted
OS is one defined as having a valid signature and some application
layer encryption (i.e. files that are encrypted) can only be
decrypted if the OS is trusted. General files are not impacted.
The disk does not need to be encrypted at all.

You claim is true insofar as some media files will not be copyable
at all. That also means that even successful data recovery will
not make them accessible again, since data recovery implies copying,
which the TPM/DRM system prohibits. This also means that these media
files have the lifetime of your storage medium. Have a disk crash
and loose them all. Personally I cannot see how that can be legal
in a civilised world. I expect that these things will get challenged
in court and eventually be made illegal. Or alternatively nobody
will buy this type of media file anymore.

Still, your own files are yours and recovery of them is not
an issue. If you choose to encrypt you disk with TPM support,
you may just have to supply your mainboard and passwort to
the data recovery outfit. Or you can just make backups like
any competent person and not need data recovery.

Arno
  #4  
Old February 23rd 06, 07:43 AM posted to comp.sys.ibm.pc.hardware.storage
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Posts: n/a
Default data encryption and data recovery?

I think it's likely the new protection will be a lot like CSS on DVDs -
used to protect commercial content, never comes into the picture for the
DVDs most of us burn.
 




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