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Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin



 
 
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  #21  
Old September 22nd 11, 11:08 AM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
artful_bodger
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin


Robert Kahle's 2007 post was all I needed to hack the adapter. Using an
8 pin microchip 10f220, I wrote the following code. It's the .HEX If
you want the source PM me.

:020000040000FA
:0800080005281F28A300A40035
:100010000830A2002508A306A30C2508A300031C92
:1000200013281830A306A30C2308A5002408A30056
:100030000310A30C2308A400A20B0A280800A501A2
:10004000F0300620103006200000003006200000AE
:084000000100020003000400AE
:02400E00F93F78
:00000001FF

The code aint pretty, but it works.

This sends a fake 90W signal to the mobo to make it think a dell adapter
is connected. I needed it because I'm off grid and I only have 24VDC.
I step this down t 18V and use the PIC to fool the mobo. Been good for
9 months now.

You'll need an old plug to connect to the laptop and you'll need to
identify +, - and signal (centre) pin.
Connect 18V into the laptop. The centre pin of the goes to pin 3 of the
PIC.
Put a ge diode anode on pin 3, cathode k on pin 2.
Put 0v on pin 7. 330n cap pin 2 to pin 7. You get about 2.5V on pin 2,
which is just enough to power the PIC. The PIC waits about 200ms and
then sends the message when requested by the mobo. There is so little
current sent by the mobo that you can barely light a LED, so only use a
DVM and dont connect anything else!

I've tested it on 2 d610 and 1 d600. Flawless!

You'll need a good grasp of electronics to make sense of this, not to
mention programming PICs. I'm not selling these and dont intend to.

Usual disclaimers apply.


  #22  
Old September 13th 12, 09:04 AM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin

On Saturday, December 8, 2007 12:22:21 AM UTC+1, wrote:
I've been looking around a lot to see if anyone had any information
about this but came up with nill...So I investigated it myself for
anyone out there that may be interested in what that center pin really
does. For those of you that think I don't know my butt from a hole in
the ground and feel like leaving any messages against what I did I'm
not asking for pointless opinions here so take them elsewhere. There
was a need for it to be reverse engineered and I did it. Enough
ranting lets get on to the beef of the post.

I too was wondering what this third center pin is about. No voltage
present to it, no resistance, no capacitance; got me wondering what
kinda surprise did Dell put in the power supply that they don't want
us to know about. So curiosity got the best of me and I very carefully
pried the glued case apart.

Standard switching power supply, but then near where the wire enters
the case and is soldered to the circuit board resides a small TO-92
device. First thought was maybe a transistor that sinks a certain
current upon attachment but after further inquiry, only two leads were
connected. This led me to reverse engineering this small circuit. It
turns out theres a 131 ohm resistor in series with the center pin wire
of the DC connecter and one pin of the 'mystery device' and then there
is a reverse biased diode going to ground. The other pin that is
connected of said device is also connected to ground (by reverse
biased I mean that the diode will only conduct if a positive voltage
were applied to the ground connection of the power supply and a
negative (ground) were connected to the center pin of the DC power
connector. This lead me to deducing, because of the series resistor,
that this diode was a zener of currently unknown breakdown voltage.

The next step was to determine the true identity of the 'mystery
device.' The part number read "Dallas 2501 (then a date code)." Dallas
being dallas semiconductor (aka Maxim IC). A search yielded only a
very incomplete datasheet refering me to the DS2502 which is a 1kbit
one-wire EPROM version. The "2501" was a DS2501 of 512 bit data space.
The datasheet gives specifications to a max programming voltage after
EPROM write instruction of 12V. This means to protect the device from
overvoltage this zener diode connected to the pins must be a 12V zener
and the sereis resistor being a current limiter protecting the diode
in the event that the inner barrel and center pin were to come into
contact.

The DS2502 and 2501 (1kbit and 512 bit respectively) use Dallas Semi.
1-Wire (R) communication protocol. It gets its power from the data
line and when the data line is low a diode protected capacitor supplys
power for its logic circuits, Parasite Power. This means that to
communicate with the DS2502/1 one only needs two lines, a data line
(logic high idle state) and ground. The power to the data/power line
is supplied by the master through a 5k ohm resistor for short cable
lengths.

Hope anyone reading this that wants to make his/her own power
converter finds this information usefull (insert disclaimer here; ie.
use this information at your own risk, I am not to be held responsible
if someone else's equipment gets fried b/c of poor design, I only
described how it works and make no claims to it being my own design
giving rights of design and operation to Dell and/or LiteOn (written
on power brick) and any other engineering firm/company/manufacturer
that was involved in the design of the motherboard, power brick and
any other associated equipment, etc.)


It would be nice to see source code of Artful_bodgers PA-10 PIC emulator, so it could be possible to make one with different PIC.
P.S. I don`t know how to send PM to Artful_bodger
  #23  
Old December 9th 12, 05:07 AM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin

After reading what Robert Kahle had found I was inspired to write my own code to read the chip in dell power supplies. I happen to have a few power supplies so I read them all and came up with the following data:

Summery of strings from my power supplies:
MFG- ?? PS -W- -V- -A- --------SerialNumber-------- CRC-16
DELL 00 AC 150 195 077 CN-0J408P-48661-228-1U2D-A02 0x9447
DELL 00 AC 090 195 046 CN-0J62H3-71615-04N-49C3-A01 0xA76D
..... 00 AC 090 195 046 CN-0C2894-48661-475-6PD3-A02 0xD533
DELL 00 AC 090 195 046 CN-09T215-71615-41U-3355-L03 0x2564
DELL 00 AC 065 195 033 CN-05U092-71615-464-0220-A03 0xEF29
DELL 00 AC 065 195 033 CN-0F7970-71615-55G-02AB-A00 0x7DAB

Robert had it all right except for the last two digits which I have verified are a CRC16 of the previous 40 bytes.
Notes: The top supply above is 150 watts proving Robert right about the three digits. The third line is very interesting as the first four digits are nulls instead of "DELL". The CRC16 is either not valid or calculated different. But my laptops don't care!

Full read of device summarized on line 1 (150 Watt,DS2502 chip)
ROM data bytes a Family[1], Address[6], and CRC[1]
09 1A 3A 0B 38 00 00 0E CRC is valid.
Chip = DS2502, 1024b Add-Only Memory
EPROM Status bytes a
FF FF FF FF FF FF FF 00 CRC:9C is valid.
EPROM Data is:
0000: 44 45 4C 4C 30 30 41 43 31 35 30 31 39 35 30 37
D E L L 0 0 A C 1 5 0 1 9 5 0 7
0010: 37 43 4E 30 4A 34 30 38 50 34 38 36 36 31 32 32
7 C N 0 J 4 0 8 P 4 8 6 6 1 2 2
0020: 38 31 55 32 44 41 30 32 47 94 FF FF FF FF FF FF
8 1 U 2 D A 0 2 G . . . . . . .
0030: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
0040: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
0050: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
0060: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
0070: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Entire EEPROM CRC: 1B is valid.
Calculated CRC16: 9447 on first 40 bytes of EPROM is a match.

Full read of device summarized on line 3. 90 Watt, old DS2501 chip, ** invalid 16bit CRC **, first 4 bytes do not say "DELL"!:
ROM data bytes a Family[1], Address[6], and CRC[1]
11 54 DB 98 00 00 00 E7 CRC is valid.
Chip = DS2501, 512b Add-Only Memory
EPROM Status bytes a
F3 FF FF FF FF FF FF 00 CRC:9C is valid.
EPROM Data is:
0000: 00 00 00 00 30 30 41 43 30 39 30 31 39 35 30 34
. . . . 0 0 A C 0 9 0 1 9 5 0 4
0010: 36 43 4E 30 43 32 38 39 34 34 38 36 36 31 34 37
6 C N 0 C 2 8 9 4 4 8 6 6 1 4 7
0020: 35 36 50 44 33 41 30 32 33 D5 FF FF FF FF FF FF
5 6 P D 3 A 0 2 3 . . . . . . .
0030: FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF FF
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Invalid EPROM data CRC: FF Calculated CRC:57
Calculated CRC16: F3E4 on first 40 bytes of EPROM is NOT a match!

Hope this helps you.
I wrote the reader program for an arduino so it should be easy for anyone who wants to use it.
  #24  
Old March 6th 13, 04:49 PM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin

On Sunday, 27 January 2008 19:25:32 UTC+5, wrote:
Robert,Thanks for effort on this, my PA10 cord got frayed and looks like the brief short took out the DS2105. I opened up the power supply and I do not see the Zener and resistor internal to the supply maybe they moved that circuitry into the laptop. In my PA10 the DS2105 appears to be wired without any supply to it atleast internal to the power supply.The Zener that you mentioned was it internal to the power supply or did you trace it to within you laptop?ThanksMike


Respected Robert !
I have accidently shorted the centeral pin with the inner barel of my PA-10 and now this adapter is not working.
Kindly guide me to resolve this problem because i am am very much interested to repair this myself!

Impatiently waiting for your reply!
  #25  
Old March 7th 13, 01:43 AM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
Mike S.
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 149
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin


In article ,
wrote:
On Sunday, 27 January 2008 19:25:32 UTC+5, wrote:
Robert,Thanks for effort on this, my PA10 cord got frayed and looks

like the brief short took out the DS2105. I opened up the power supply
and I do not see the Zener and resistor internal to the supply maybe
they moved that circuitry into the laptop. In my PA10 the DS2105 appears
to be wired without any supply to it atleast internal to the power
supply.The Zener that you mentioned was it internal to the power supply
or did you trace it to within you laptop?ThanksMike

Respected Robert !
I have accidently shorted the centeral pin with the inner barel of my
PA-10 and now this adapter is not working.
Kindly guide me to resolve this problem because i am am very much
interested to repair this myself!

Impatiently waiting for your reply!


You may need a lot of patience; after 5 years it is doubtful that the
original posters of this message thread are still reading the topic.


  #26  
Old March 14th 13, 03:18 PM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin

On Thursday, September 22, 2011 6:08:30 AM UTC-4, artful_bodger wrote:
Robert Kahle's 2007 post was all I needed to hack the adapter. Using an

8 pin microchip 10f220, I wrote the following code. It's the .HEX If

you want the source PM me.



:020000040000FA

:0800080005281F28A300A40035

:100010000830A2002508A306A30C2508A300031C92

:1000200013281830A306A30C2308A5002408A30056

:100030000310A30C2308A400A20B0A280800A501A2

:10004000F0300620103006200000003006200000AE

:084000000100020003000400AE

:02400E00F93F78

:00000001FF



The code aint pretty, but it works.



This sends a fake 90W signal to the mobo to make it think a dell adapter

is connected. I needed it because I'm off grid and I only have 24VDC.

I step this down t 18V and use the PIC to fool the mobo. Been good for

9 months now.



You'll need an old plug to connect to the laptop and you'll need to

identify +, - and signal (centre) pin.

Connect 18V into the laptop. The centre pin of the goes to pin 3 of the

PIC.

Put a ge diode anode on pin 3, cathode k on pin 2.

Put 0v on pin 7. 330n cap pin 2 to pin 7. You get about 2.5V on pin 2,

which is just enough to power the PIC. The PIC waits about 200ms and

then sends the message when requested by the mobo. There is so little

current sent by the mobo that you can barely light a LED, so only use a

DVM and dont connect anything else!



I've tested it on 2 d610 and 1 d600. Flawless!



You'll need a good grasp of electronics to make sense of this, not to

mention programming PICs. I'm not selling these and dont intend to.



Usual disclaimers apply.


Dear Artful_bodger and Robert Kahle:

It seems like I'm forced to go with your solution using the pic10F220 or re flashing the DS2502 and to practice my forgotten skills in programing with my PICkit 2. I needed the mentioned modification because a Dell D600 has problem with the DC jack and USB ports. So I bought a Docking Station which seems to be happy only with the PA-10 Geniune Chinese PS which I don't have. I opened another suitable Dell PS model ADP-90FB modded using the plug connector from a PA-12 and connected the DS2502 on it. The D600 is able to charge and works fine if I turned ON the laptop,let it pass all posts, and then plug the Docking. With this last process it results the Docking station bypassed its Power(turned off) and obviously not USB's or other Docking hardware is working.

So now after I explained my scenario please let me know the a suitable solution : a working Ds2502 firmware and instructions to load the program;
or a little schematic for the Pic10f220 on its VDD power supply(wanted to be sure the GE diode is detecting and rectifying some induced signals to produce the start up Vcc which is later taking from the output port pin #3).

Best Regards

Werner

  #27  
Old October 10th 13, 02:24 PM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin

W dniu czwartek, 22 września 2011 12:08:30 UTC+2 użytkownik artful_bodger napisał:
Robert Kahle's 2007 post was all I needed to hack the adapter. Using an

8 pin microchip 10f220, I wrote the following code. It's the .HEX If

you want the source PM me.



:020000040000FA

:0800080005281F28A300A40035

:100010000830A2002508A306A30C2508A300031C92

:1000200013281830A306A30C2308A5002408A30056

:100030000310A30C2308A400A20B0A280800A501A2

:10004000F0300620103006200000003006200000AE

:084000000100020003000400AE

:02400E00F93F78

:00000001FF



The code aint pretty, but it works.



This sends a fake 90W signal to the mobo to make it think a dell adapter

is connected. I needed it because I'm off grid and I only have 24VDC.

I step this down t 18V and use the PIC to fool the mobo. Been good for

9 months now.



You'll need an old plug to connect to the laptop and you'll need to

identify +, - and signal (centre) pin.

Connect 18V into the laptop. The centre pin of the goes to pin 3 of the

PIC.

Put a ge diode anode on pin 3, cathode k on pin 2.

Put 0v on pin 7. 330n cap pin 2 to pin 7. You get about 2.5V on pin 2,

which is just enough to power the PIC. The PIC waits about 200ms and

then sends the message when requested by the mobo. There is so little

current sent by the mobo that you can barely light a LED, so only use a

DVM and dont connect anything else!



I've tested it on 2 d610 and 1 d600. Flawless!



You'll need a good grasp of electronics to make sense of this, not to

mention programming PICs. I'm not selling these and dont intend to.



Usual disclaimers apply.



Can you send me the source code?
It's very importand for me.

Thanks
  #28  
Old December 31st 13, 01:19 PM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin

On Saturday, 8 December 2007 00:22:21 UTC+1, wrote:
I've been looking around a lot to see if anyone had any information
about this but came up with nill...So I investigated it myself for
anyone out there that may be interested in what that center pin really
does. For those of you that think I don't know my butt from a hole in
the ground and feel like leaving any messages against what I did I'm
not asking for pointless opinions here so take them elsewhere. There
was a need for it to be reverse engineered and I did it. Enough
ranting lets get on to the beef of the post.

I too was wondering what this third center pin is about. No voltage
present to it, no resistance, no capacitance; got me wondering what
kinda surprise did Dell put in the power supply that they don't want
us to know about. So curiosity got the best of me and I very carefully
pried the glued case apart.

Standard switching power supply, but then near where the wire enters
the case and is soldered to the circuit board resides a small TO-92
device. First thought was maybe a transistor that sinks a certain
current upon attachment but after further inquiry, only two leads were
connected. This led me to reverse engineering this small circuit. It
turns out theres a 131 ohm resistor in series with the center pin wire
of the DC connecter and one pin of the 'mystery device' and then there
is a reverse biased diode going to ground. The other pin that is
connected of said device is also connected to ground (by reverse
biased I mean that the diode will only conduct if a positive voltage
were applied to the ground connection of the power supply and a
negative (ground) were connected to the center pin of the DC power
connector. This lead me to deducing, because of the series resistor,
that this diode was a zener of currently unknown breakdown voltage.

The next step was to determine the true identity of the 'mystery
device.' The part number read "Dallas 2501 (then a date code)." Dallas
being dallas semiconductor (aka Maxim IC). A search yielded only a
very incomplete datasheet refering me to the DS2502 which is a 1kbit
one-wire EPROM version. The "2501" was a DS2501 of 512 bit data space.
The datasheet gives specifications to a max programming voltage after
EPROM write instruction of 12V. This means to protect the device from
overvoltage this zener diode connected to the pins must be a 12V zener
and the sereis resistor being a current limiter protecting the diode
in the event that the inner barrel and center pin were to come into
contact.

The DS2502 and 2501 (1kbit and 512 bit respectively) use Dallas Semi.
1-Wire (R) communication protocol. It gets its power from the data
line and when the data line is low a diode protected capacitor supplys
power for its logic circuits, Parasite Power. This means that to
communicate with the DS2502/1 one only needs two lines, a data line
(logic high idle state) and ground. The power to the data/power line
is supplied by the master through a 5k ohm resistor for short cable
lengths.

Hope anyone reading this that wants to make his/her own power
converter finds this information usefull (insert disclaimer here; ie.
use this information at your own risk, I am not to be held responsible
if someone else's equipment gets fried b/c of poor design, I only
described how it works and make no claims to it being my own design
giving rights of design and operation to Dell and/or LiteOn (written
on power brick) and any other engineering firm/company/manufacturer
that was involved in the design of the motherboard, power brick and
any other associated equipment, etc.)


Hi. I have an old Dell laptop that I want to convert into a small server. I do not't have an original dell charger but I have an aftermarket one. It won't let the CPU run at the full speed without identifying the power adapter. If emulation is possible using a PIC can this be done using an Arduino or an AVR microcontroller. I have plenty of atmgea8 and atmega88 that can use to bypass this but I do not know how the communication works. Can some one help me to make an emulation using AVR please?
  #29  
Old December 31st 13, 01:27 PM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin

On Thursday, 22 September 2011 12:08:30 UTC+2, artful_bodger wrote:
Robert Kahle's 2007 post was all I needed to hack the adapter. Using an

8 pin microchip 10f220, I wrote the following code. It's the .HEX If

you want the source PM me.



:020000040000FA

:0800080005281F28A300A40035

:100010000830A2002508A306A30C2508A300031C92

:1000200013281830A306A30C2308A5002408A30056

:100030000310A30C2308A400A20B0A280800A501A2

:10004000F0300620103006200000003006200000AE

:084000000100020003000400AE

:02400E00F93F78

:00000001FF



The code aint pretty, but it works.



This sends a fake 90W signal to the mobo to make it think a dell adapter

is connected. I needed it because I'm off grid and I only have 24VDC.

I step this down t 18V and use the PIC to fool the mobo. Been good for

9 months now.



You'll need an old plug to connect to the laptop and you'll need to

identify +, - and signal (centre) pin.

Connect 18V into the laptop. The centre pin of the goes to pin 3 of the

PIC.

Put a ge diode anode on pin 3, cathode k on pin 2.

Put 0v on pin 7. 330n cap pin 2 to pin 7. You get about 2.5V on pin 2,

which is just enough to power the PIC. The PIC waits about 200ms and

then sends the message when requested by the mobo. There is so little

current sent by the mobo that you can barely light a LED, so only use a

DVM and dont connect anything else!



I've tested it on 2 d610 and 1 d600. Flawless!



You'll need a good grasp of electronics to make sense of this, not to

mention programming PICs. I'm not selling these and dont intend to.



Usual disclaimers apply.


Hi. Can you please send me the source code please so that I could convert it to an AVR microcontroller please.
  #30  
Old January 21st 14, 09:46 AM posted to alt.sys.pc-clone.dell
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1
Default Dell PA-10 ac adapter center pin

Hi
Can you give me the source, I need to convert it to pic12f675 or 12f509...

Olivier
 




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