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Asus P9X79 four short beeps



 
 
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  #1  
Old May 1st 18, 06:13 PM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Bill Anderson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 243
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

It began happening a few weeks ago -- I'd try to boot but before post
I'd hear four short beeps followed by the post chirp (different sound)
and then nothing. But it was an intermittent problem and I let it go
when rebooting seemed to solve things.

Then yesterday the problem stuck around through several attempted
reboots and I figured I'd better do something. So I looked up the error
beep table on the Asus website and found nothing about four short beeps.
Thanks, Asus. Then I branched out and learned Asus uses American
Megatrends' AMI BIOS, and that four beeps mean System Timer Failure,
which further means something's wrong with memory.

That was when I actually looked at BIOS to see how much memory I had and
I learned my four 8-gig memory sticks were producing not 32 gigs of
memory, but just 8 and change. In other words, only one stick was working.

So just now I removed all the memory and began replacing sticks one at a
time. At first I couldn't get past the four beeps, but I kept replacing
sticks in the D1 slot until one worked. (The manual says to put a
single stick in D1.) Then I put a stick in B1 as shown in the manual and
went right back to the four error beeps.

But I persevered, removing and re-inserting, and eventually I had two
working, then four, and now I'm booting nicely and BIOS shows total
memory at 32 gigs and change.

Funny things was -- the AIDA 64 Extreme system monitor software always
showed four slots filled with 8-gig sticks. It saw them when BIOS
didn't. Weird.

But things are fine now. I think. Maybe I oughta run Memtest just to be
sure...

--
Bill Anderson

I am the Mighty Favog
  #2  
Old May 1st 18, 06:42 PM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Shadow[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 132
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

On Tue, 1 May 2018 12:13:44 -0500, Bill Anderson
wrote:

It began happening a few weeks ago -- I'd try to boot but before post
I'd hear four short beeps followed by the post chirp (different sound)
and then nothing. But it was an intermittent problem and I let it go
when rebooting seemed to solve things.

Then yesterday the problem stuck around through several attempted
reboots and I figured I'd better do something. So I looked up the error
beep table on the Asus website and found nothing about four short beeps.
Thanks, Asus. Then I branched out and learned Asus uses American
Megatrends' AMI BIOS, and that four beeps mean System Timer Failure,
which further means something's wrong with memory.

That was when I actually looked at BIOS to see how much memory I had and
I learned my four 8-gig memory sticks were producing not 32 gigs of
memory, but just 8 and change. In other words, only one stick was working.

So just now I removed all the memory and began replacing sticks one at a
time. At first I couldn't get past the four beeps, but I kept replacing
sticks in the D1 slot until one worked. (The manual says to put a
single stick in D1.) Then I put a stick in B1 as shown in the manual and
went right back to the four error beeps.

But I persevered, removing and re-inserting, and eventually I had two
working, then four, and now I'm booting nicely and BIOS shows total
memory at 32 gigs and change.

Funny things was -- the AIDA 64 Extreme system monitor software always
showed four slots filled with 8-gig sticks. It saw them when BIOS
didn't. Weird.

But things are fine now. I think. Maybe I oughta run Memtest just to be
sure...


Either one or more of the sticks were badly seated or you have
bad RAM.
Since it's usually an intermittent problem, I'd run Memtest
ASAP. Let it run overnight.
[]'s
--
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy - Google 2012
  #3  
Old May 1st 18, 06:59 PM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 832
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

Bill Anderson wrote:
It began happening a few weeks ago -- I'd try to boot but before post
I'd hear four short beeps followed by the post chirp (different sound)
and then nothing. But it was an intermittent problem and I let it go
when rebooting seemed to solve things.

Then yesterday the problem stuck around through several attempted
reboots and I figured I'd better do something. So I looked up the error
beep table on the Asus website and found nothing about four short beeps.
Thanks, Asus. Then I branched out and learned Asus uses American
Megatrends' AMI BIOS, and that four beeps mean System Timer Failure,
which further means something's wrong with memory.

That was when I actually looked at BIOS to see how much memory I had and
I learned my four 8-gig memory sticks were producing not 32 gigs of
memory, but just 8 and change. In other words, only one stick was working.

So just now I removed all the memory and began replacing sticks one at a
time. At first I couldn't get past the four beeps, but I kept replacing
sticks in the D1 slot until one worked. (The manual says to put a
single stick in D1.) Then I put a stick in B1 as shown in the manual and
went right back to the four error beeps.

But I persevered, removing and re-inserting, and eventually I had two
working, then four, and now I'm booting nicely and BIOS shows total
memory at 32 gigs and change.

Funny things was -- the AIDA 64 Extreme system monitor software always
showed four slots filled with 8-gig sticks. It saw them when BIOS
didn't. Weird.

But things are fine now. I think. Maybe I oughta run Memtest just to be
sure...


Memory is detected two ways at BIOS level.

1) Read config info from SPD PROM on each DIMM.

2) Once the BIOS knows a DIMM is present, it uses "peek & poke"
testing to prove "a RAM is a RAM" and that it can actually
store stuff.

One of the "proof cases" for this, was the day when
some brand of DIMMs, had the wrong SPD chip soldered
to them. The DIMM may have declared it had 256MB on it,
when the physical chips were 128MB. The BIOS (correctly)
did "peek & poke" and measured 128MB, and the system
started just fine and ran with the reduced amount
of memory. Because in fact, that's all the physical memory
that was present on the stick.

This issue seemed to first show up on triple channel memory.
Maybe a 12GB system would be detected as an 8GB system. At
first, people might have tried blaming a "socket contact"
issue for the problem.

Then later, people started randomly adjusting the IMC or
VNorthbridge. And then there were claims that this
was "fixing it".

I don't know if I've ever seen a company web site
(Asus or Intel) making claims as to why this happens.

When the OS is running, hardware identification software
continues to have access to the SPD and can then
claim that 32GB are "installed", even if the BIOS
has tested and chosen to only use a subset, because
"peek & poke" is failing.

"Peek & poke" is a quick check of memory presence and
does not represent a full memory test. That may come
later in the POST, if the user has enabled it.

*******

And yes, doing some memtest is a good idea.
Between that, and something like Prime95, you'll get
a better idea whether it's really working properly or not.

Paul
  #4  
Old May 1st 18, 10:10 PM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Bill Anderson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 243
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

On 5/1/2018 12:42 PM, Shadow wrote:
On Tue, 1 May 2018 12:13:44 -0500, Bill Anderson
wrote:

It began happening a few weeks ago -- I'd try to boot but before post
I'd hear four short beeps followed by the post chirp (different sound)
and then nothing. But it was an intermittent problem and I let it go
when rebooting seemed to solve things.

Then yesterday the problem stuck around through several attempted
reboots and I figured I'd better do something. So I looked up the error
beep table on the Asus website and found nothing about four short beeps.
Thanks, Asus. Then I branched out and learned Asus uses American
Megatrends' AMI BIOS, and that four beeps mean System Timer Failure,
which further means something's wrong with memory.

That was when I actually looked at BIOS to see how much memory I had and
I learned my four 8-gig memory sticks were producing not 32 gigs of
memory, but just 8 and change. In other words, only one stick was working.

So just now I removed all the memory and began replacing sticks one at a
time. At first I couldn't get past the four beeps, but I kept replacing
sticks in the D1 slot until one worked. (The manual says to put a
single stick in D1.) Then I put a stick in B1 as shown in the manual and
went right back to the four error beeps.

But I persevered, removing and re-inserting, and eventually I had two
working, then four, and now I'm booting nicely and BIOS shows total
memory at 32 gigs and change.

Funny things was -- the AIDA 64 Extreme system monitor software always
showed four slots filled with 8-gig sticks. It saw them when BIOS
didn't. Weird.

But things are fine now. I think. Maybe I oughta run Memtest just to be
sure...


Either one or more of the sticks were badly seated or you have
bad RAM.
Since it's usually an intermittent problem, I'd run Memtest
ASAP. Let it run overnight.
[]'s


I'm thinking three of the sticks, or maybe just one, affecting the
others, somehow became unseated. Maybe fluctuations in temperature over
time caused it, I dunno. I certainly hadn't been in there bumping
around. I learned there's a technique to seating the sticks on the
P9X79. Most memory slots I've seen over the years have locking levers on
both ends, but the P9X79 has a lock on only one end, with a passive
slotted block on the other. To get things seated, I had to press the
stick firmly in the slotted block end and then press hard on the locking
end to snap the stick in place. Pressing evenly across the stick seemed
not to work as well.

I did run one full pass of Memtest and saw no errors. Maybe I'll let it
run all night as you suggest, but I've found if there are going to be
Memtest errors, they'll pop up long before one full pass is completed.

--
Bill Anderson

I am the Mighty Favog
  #5  
Old May 1st 18, 10:13 PM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Bill Anderson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 243
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

On 5/1/2018 12:59 PM, Paul wrote:
Bill Anderson wrote:
It began happening a few weeks ago -- I'd try to boot but before post
I'd hear four short beeps followed by the post chirp (different sound)
and then nothing.* But it was an intermittent problem and I let it go
when rebooting seemed to solve things.

Then yesterday the problem stuck around through several attempted
reboots and I figured I'd better do something.* So I looked up the
error beep table on the Asus website and found nothing about four
short beeps. Thanks, Asus.* Then I branched out and learned Asus uses
American Megatrends' AMI BIOS,* and that four beeps mean System Timer
Failure, which further means something's wrong with memory.

That was when I actually looked at BIOS to see how much memory I had
and I learned my four 8-gig memory sticks were producing not 32 gigs
of memory, but just 8 and change.* In other words, only one stick was
working.

So just now I removed all the memory and began replacing sticks one at
a time. At first I couldn't get past the four beeps, but I kept
replacing sticks in the D1 slot until one worked.* (The manual says to
put a single stick in D1.) Then I put a stick in B1 as shown in the
manual and went right back to the four error beeps.

But I persevered, removing and re-inserting, and eventually I had two
working, then four, and now I'm booting nicely and BIOS shows total
memory at 32 gigs and change.

Funny things was -- the AIDA 64 Extreme system monitor software always
showed four slots filled with 8-gig sticks.* It saw them when BIOS
didn't. Weird.

But things are fine now.* I think. Maybe I oughta run Memtest just to
be sure...


Memory is detected two ways at BIOS level.

1) Read config info from SPD PROM on each DIMM.

2) Once the BIOS knows a DIMM is present, it uses "peek & poke"
** testing to prove "a RAM is a RAM" and that it can actually
** store stuff.

One of the "proof cases" for this, was the day when
some brand of DIMMs, had the wrong SPD chip soldered
to them. The DIMM may have declared it had 256MB on it,
when the physical chips were 128MB. The BIOS (correctly)
did "peek & poke" and measured 128MB, and the system
started just fine and ran with the reduced amount
of memory. Because in fact, that's all the physical memory
that was present on the stick.

This issue seemed to first show up on triple channel memory.
Maybe a 12GB system would be detected as an 8GB system. At
first, people might have tried blaming a "socket contact"
issue for the problem.

Then later, people started randomly adjusting the IMC or
VNorthbridge. And then there were claims that this
was "fixing it".

I don't know if I've ever seen a company web site
(Asus or Intel) making claims as to why this happens.

When the OS is running, hardware identification software
continues to have access to the SPD and can then
claim that 32GB are "installed", even if the BIOS
has tested and chosen to only use a subset, because
"peek & poke" is failing.

"Peek & poke" is a quick check of memory presence and
does not represent a full memory test. That may come
later in the POST, if the user has enabled it.

*******

And yes, doing some memtest is a good idea.
Between that, and something like Prime95, you'll get
a better idea whether it's really working properly or not.

** Paul


I think re-seating the memory sticks was what I needed to do. BIOS is
showing 32 gigs of RAM now and so is Win10. I think you must be right
about how software might see the RAM sticks when BIOS couldn't. It's
always something. Thanks, Paul.

--
Bill Anderson

I am the Mighty Favog
  #6  
Old May 3rd 18, 02:42 AM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Bill Anderson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 243
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

On 5/1/2018 12:59 PM, Paul wrote:
Bill Anderson wrote:
It began happening a few weeks ago -- I'd try to boot but before post
I'd hear four short beeps followed by the post chirp (different sound)
and then nothing.* But it was an intermittent problem and I let it go
when rebooting seemed to solve things.

Then yesterday the problem stuck around through several attempted
reboots and I figured I'd better do something.* So I looked up the
error beep table on the Asus website and found nothing about four
short beeps. Thanks, Asus.* Then I branched out and learned Asus uses
American Megatrends' AMI BIOS,* and that four beeps mean System Timer
Failure, which further means something's wrong with memory.

That was when I actually looked at BIOS to see how much memory I had
and I learned my four 8-gig memory sticks were producing not 32 gigs
of memory, but just 8 and change.* In other words, only one stick was
working.

So just now I removed all the memory and began replacing sticks one at
a time. At first I couldn't get past the four beeps, but I kept
replacing sticks in the D1 slot until one worked.* (The manual says to
put a single stick in D1.) Then I put a stick in B1 as shown in the
manual and went right back to the four error beeps.

But I persevered, removing and re-inserting, and eventually I had two
working, then four, and now I'm booting nicely and BIOS shows total
memory at 32 gigs and change.

Funny things was -- the AIDA 64 Extreme system monitor software always
showed four slots filled with 8-gig sticks.* It saw them when BIOS
didn't. Weird.

But things are fine now.* I think. Maybe I oughta run Memtest just to
be sure...


Memory is detected two ways at BIOS level.

1) Read config info from SPD PROM on each DIMM.

2) Once the BIOS knows a DIMM is present, it uses "peek & poke"
** testing to prove "a RAM is a RAM" and that it can actually
** store stuff.

One of the "proof cases" for this, was the day when
some brand of DIMMs, had the wrong SPD chip soldered
to them. The DIMM may have declared it had 256MB on it,
when the physical chips were 128MB. The BIOS (correctly)
did "peek & poke" and measured 128MB, and the system
started just fine and ran with the reduced amount
of memory. Because in fact, that's all the physical memory
that was present on the stick.

This issue seemed to first show up on triple channel memory.
Maybe a 12GB system would be detected as an 8GB system. At
first, people might have tried blaming a "socket contact"
issue for the problem.

Then later, people started randomly adjusting the IMC or
VNorthbridge. And then there were claims that this
was "fixing it".

I don't know if I've ever seen a company web site
(Asus or Intel) making claims as to why this happens.

When the OS is running, hardware identification software
continues to have access to the SPD and can then
claim that 32GB are "installed", even if the BIOS
has tested and chosen to only use a subset, because
"peek & poke" is failing.

"Peek & poke" is a quick check of memory presence and
does not represent a full memory test. That may come
later in the POST, if the user has enabled it.

*******

And yes, doing some memtest is a good idea.
Between that, and something like Prime95, you'll get
a better idea whether it's really working properly or not.

** Paul


I wrote a long post explaining I still have the problem, then I had a
bright idea about how to test, and now I still have the problem only my
testing has shown it isn't exactly what I thought it was. Got that?

So I've deleted the draft of my earlier post, and now I'll try to keep
this as short as possible:

1) I could boot and Windows was seeing all 32 gigabytes of RAM, four
8-gig sticks in four slots.
2) If I shut down and immediately rebooted (not a restart - a full
shutdown and reboot) I'd get the four beeps before POST error. A simple
restart was no problem. Booting from a full shutdown was the problem.
3) If I waited like 10-15 minutes after a full shutdown I could reboot
and everything would be back to normal -- Windows seeing all 32 gigs of RAM.
4) I decided to test each memory stick, so I pulled all but the one in
slot D1 (the slot for single sticks) and booted and shut down and
rebooted and no problem
5) Tested another stick the same way -- boot, shut down, reboot. No problem.
6) Tested a third stick -- oops! Four beeps on reboot. Wait a while
and boot easily. Reboot and -- four beeps. So I set this stick aside.
7) Tested the fourth stick -- no problem.
8) Tested the suspect stick again -- boot once, OK. Second time -- four
beep error.
9) Aha! I've found the culprit. Right?
10) Put one good stick in slot D1. Boots fine.
11) Put a second stick in slot B1 as shown in the manual. Boots fine.
But...what's this? BIOS is showing only 8 gigs of RAM.
12) Reset stick in slot B1. No go. And again. And again. And let's
try the other good stick. No go. Still only 8 gigs of RAM. I should
be seeing 16 gigabytes of RAM but I'm getting nothing out of slot B1.
Remember -- when I started this test I was seeing 32 gigs, so B1 must
have been working then. But not now.

So here I am running my system (nicely, I suppose) with one 8-gig stick
of RAM installed. And I'm thinking my Asus P9X79 MBO is going bad. Is
that what you're thinking?

--
Bill Anderson

I am the Mighty Favog
  #7  
Old May 3rd 18, 04:22 AM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Bill Anderson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 243
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

Forgot to mention I ran Memtest on all 32 gigs for six hours last night
and there were no errors.


--
Bill Anderson

I am the Mighty Favog
  #8  
Old May 3rd 18, 06:14 AM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 832
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

Bill Anderson wrote:
On 5/1/2018 12:59 PM, Paul wrote:
Bill Anderson wrote:
It began happening a few weeks ago -- I'd try to boot but before post
I'd hear four short beeps followed by the post chirp (different
sound) and then nothing. But it was an intermittent problem and I
let it go when rebooting seemed to solve things.

Then yesterday the problem stuck around through several attempted
reboots and I figured I'd better do something. So I looked up the
error beep table on the Asus website and found nothing about four
short beeps. Thanks, Asus. Then I branched out and learned Asus uses
American Megatrends' AMI BIOS, and that four beeps mean System Timer
Failure, which further means something's wrong with memory.

That was when I actually looked at BIOS to see how much memory I had
and I learned my four 8-gig memory sticks were producing not 32 gigs
of memory, but just 8 and change. In other words, only one stick was
working.

So just now I removed all the memory and began replacing sticks one
at a time. At first I couldn't get past the four beeps, but I kept
replacing sticks in the D1 slot until one worked. (The manual says
to put a single stick in D1.) Then I put a stick in B1 as shown in
the manual and went right back to the four error beeps.

But I persevered, removing and re-inserting, and eventually I had two
working, then four, and now I'm booting nicely and BIOS shows total
memory at 32 gigs and change.

Funny things was -- the AIDA 64 Extreme system monitor software
always showed four slots filled with 8-gig sticks. It saw them when
BIOS didn't. Weird.

But things are fine now. I think. Maybe I oughta run Memtest just to
be sure...


Memory is detected two ways at BIOS level.

1) Read config info from SPD PROM on each DIMM.

2) Once the BIOS knows a DIMM is present, it uses "peek & poke"
testing to prove "a RAM is a RAM" and that it can actually
store stuff.

One of the "proof cases" for this, was the day when
some brand of DIMMs, had the wrong SPD chip soldered
to them. The DIMM may have declared it had 256MB on it,
when the physical chips were 128MB. The BIOS (correctly)
did "peek & poke" and measured 128MB, and the system
started just fine and ran with the reduced amount
of memory. Because in fact, that's all the physical memory
that was present on the stick.

This issue seemed to first show up on triple channel memory.
Maybe a 12GB system would be detected as an 8GB system. At
first, people might have tried blaming a "socket contact"
issue for the problem.

Then later, people started randomly adjusting the IMC or
VNorthbridge. And then there were claims that this
was "fixing it".

I don't know if I've ever seen a company web site
(Asus or Intel) making claims as to why this happens.

When the OS is running, hardware identification software
continues to have access to the SPD and can then
claim that 32GB are "installed", even if the BIOS
has tested and chosen to only use a subset, because
"peek & poke" is failing.

"Peek & poke" is a quick check of memory presence and
does not represent a full memory test. That may come
later in the POST, if the user has enabled it.

*******

And yes, doing some memtest is a good idea.
Between that, and something like Prime95, you'll get
a better idea whether it's really working properly or not.

Paul


I wrote a long post explaining I still have the problem, then I had a
bright idea about how to test, and now I still have the problem only my
testing has shown it isn't exactly what I thought it was. Got that?

So I've deleted the draft of my earlier post, and now I'll try to keep
this as short as possible:

1) I could boot and Windows was seeing all 32 gigabytes of RAM, four
8-gig sticks in four slots.
2) If I shut down and immediately rebooted (not a restart - a full
shutdown and reboot) I'd get the four beeps before POST error. A simple
restart was no problem. Booting from a full shutdown was the problem.
3) If I waited like 10-15 minutes after a full shutdown I could reboot
and everything would be back to normal -- Windows seeing all 32 gigs of
RAM.
4) I decided to test each memory stick, so I pulled all but the one in
slot D1 (the slot for single sticks) and booted and shut down and
rebooted and no problem
5) Tested another stick the same way -- boot, shut down, reboot. No
problem.
6) Tested a third stick -- oops! Four beeps on reboot. Wait a while
and boot easily. Reboot and -- four beeps. So I set this stick aside.
7) Tested the fourth stick -- no problem.
8) Tested the suspect stick again -- boot once, OK. Second time -- four
beep error.
9) Aha! I've found the culprit. Right?
10) Put one good stick in slot D1. Boots fine.
11) Put a second stick in slot B1 as shown in the manual. Boots fine.
But...what's this? BIOS is showing only 8 gigs of RAM.
12) Reset stick in slot B1. No go. And again. And again. And let's
try the other good stick. No go. Still only 8 gigs of RAM. I should
be seeing 16 gigabytes of RAM but I'm getting nothing out of slot B1.
Remember -- when I started this test I was seeing 32 gigs, so B1 must
have been working then. But not now.

So here I am running my system (nicely, I suppose) with one 8-gig stick
of RAM installed. And I'm thinking my Asus P9X79 MBO is going bad. Is
that what you're thinking?


The memory controller is inside the processor itself.

The motherboard contributes power regulators.

VDimm
Vtt (terminator)
VNorthbridge (powers IMC, uncore)

The motherboard also contributes copper tracks.

The sockets all have to make contact.

It's very hard to determine a root cause in this particular
case, by testing one combination after another of DIMMs. This
is how the first wave of testing concluded it was the CPU socket
was at fault. And you can tell from your testing, that's not
likely to be the case. If a contact was truly flaky, you'd
expect to have the CPU "crash" in the middle of a session.
And that's not happening. Notice how it's always an
orderly BIOS issue.

While I might look at the VNorthbridge, and adjust it one
notch, it's up to you to decide what to test next, due
to the large number of variables, and the possibility of
disturbing something while going from one test setup
to the next.

When I had a stick on a previous set of RAM start to throw
errors, one or two notches on VNorthbridge fixed it (on
a X48 Northbridge). The regulators have a fairly fine
gradation, so we're not talking about a very large
voltage change here.

It's a good thing that previous motherboards here were
rather lacking in voltage adjustments, but at the same
time, they didn't have RAM problems like these 2channel
boards do. Both 3 channel and 4 channel processors have
exhibited this problem.

There have been older boards, where somebody at the factory
didn't test the memory map when "full". One board, if you
installed 4GB (its max), the USB ports would indicate "overcurrent",
which means that the process of setting up the memory,
was splattering some control bits in a USB register. Which
means the memory map wasn't planned properly by the BIOS.

You could also consider examining the voltage controls
on your board, just to make sure there wasn't a BIOS
settings corruption at the heart of this. And that the
voltage regulators are *undervolted*. Usually the boards
have a color scheme, with green (normal), amber (slight boost),
red (might be getting close to a hardware limit). But undervolt
would be below green in a sense. If the BIOS is well designed,
the "default" value or factory value should be shown in
a different color, so you know what the normal value is.

Paul
  #9  
Old May 3rd 18, 06:15 AM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 832
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

Bill Anderson wrote:
Forgot to mention I ran Memtest on all 32 gigs for six hours last night
and there were no errors.


So it's probably not the RAM itself.

Something about the processor and its built-in memory
controller. Or the voltage regulators that power the
various parts there.

Paul
  #10  
Old May 4th 18, 01:34 AM posted to alt.comp.periphs.mainboard.asus
Bill Anderson
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 243
Default Asus P9X79 four short beeps

On 5/3/2018 12:15 AM, Paul wrote:
Bill Anderson wrote:
Forgot to mention I ran Memtest on all 32 gigs for six hours last
night and there were no errors.


So it's probably not the RAM itself.

Something about the processor and its built-in memory
controller. Or the voltage regulators that power the
various parts there.

** Paul


I think you put me on the right path in your previous message, Paul, and
once again I thank you. I've adjusted things in BIOS and reinstalled
all four RAM sticks and I'm showing 32 gigs of healthy memory and the
system has been booting flawlessly from shut-down state. All I did was
go to the memory adjustments in BIOS and try to make everything as
untweaked as possible. Here's how things look now:

https://goo.gl/D3x3L7

All this overclocking tweaking stuff is too much for me to even want to
figure out. I do remember a few years back trying to tweak timings and
so forth, based on advice I'd either read on the internet or that you'd
given me. I just don't remember. Whatever, It had all been working
fine up until recently and I'd given it no more thought. Something must
have goosed BIOS, I dunno. It certainly wasn't me. Maybe now I can
stop thinking about it again.

Of course things may all go south any time, but right now I'm feeling
pretty good about my current setup and I've stopped looking at the
latest and greatest Asus motherboards and Intel i7 processors. Boy, you
can spend a lot of money on that stuff...

Thanks again.

--
Bill Anderson

I am the Mighty Favog
 




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