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I just bought a firestick



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 6th 18, 09:50 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Rodney Pont[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 20
Default I just bought a firestick

On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 16:10:28 -0500, Seymore4Head wrote:

On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 20:29:50 +0000 (GMT), "Rodney Pont"
wrote:

On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 14:37:19 -0500, Seymore4Head wrote:

It's a shame that Cat5 can't use piggyback connections. It would be
nice to share one Cat 5 between devices as I wouldn't ever be using
both devices at the same time.


You can send several connections at once down cat5 if you are using it
for ethernet, you just need a switch (or even a hub) at the tv end to
connect both devices. Your incoming cat5 goes into one port and you
have two short cables to connect to your two devices, just as you do
with a USB hub. You can just unplug one and plug in the other if you
wish as well but that will wear out the connections before very long.


I knew that you could use a hub. I was thinking more along the lines
of something like a phone splitter.

It would be nice if devices came with an in and an out like a modem
used to. Actually I guess modems still do that, but I haven't used
one in ages.


They are something like a phone spitter but you need electronics in
the box to do it. All ports are in and out and if you get a gigabit
switch it will sort out which way the wiring is itself and they are
not expensive.

Have a look at those here to get an idea of what you can get;

https://www.cclonline.com/category/5...Switches-Hubs/

Then find a supplier in your country. Don't forget the two patch
leads to connect your equipment up with.
--
Faster, cheaper, quieter than HS2
and built in 5 years;
UKUltraspeed http://www.500kmh.com/


  #12  
Old February 7th 18, 01:31 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
SC Tom
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default I just bought a firestick



"Seymore4Head" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 20:29:50 +0000 (GMT), "Rodney Pont"
wrote:

On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 14:37:19 -0500, Seymore4Head wrote:

It's a shame that Cat5 can't use piggyback connections. It would be
nice to share one Cat 5 between devices as I wouldn't ever be using
both devices at the same time.


You can send several connections at once down cat5 if you are using it
for ethernet, you just need a switch (or even a hub) at the tv end to
connect both devices. Your incoming cat5 goes into one port and you
have two short cables to connect to your two devices, just as you do
with a USB hub. You can just unplug one and plug in the other if you
wish as well but that will wear out the connections before very long.


I knew that you could use a hub. I was thinking more along the lines
of something like a phone splitter.

It would be nice if devices came with an in and an out like a modem
used to. Actually I guess modems still do that, but I haven't used
one in ages.




There is a splitter made (actually, many):
https://www.amazon.com/Insten-Ethernet-Splitter-Connector-Adapter/dp/B003C2QS90

You can only use one device at a time, though.
Check out the customer image gallery and it shows how you use two splitters
with one cable; maybe that would work. You would have one splitter near your
router with two ports connected to it, then the cable that goes to your TV
is plugged into the 2nd splitter, and then the TV and Firestick, like this:
https://cdn.instructables.com/FQP/430D/O1NEP27ZK4R/FQP430DO1NEP27ZK4R.LARGE.jpg

I'm assuming both devices can be used at the same time using that method. My
assumption is that each "side" of the splitter uses two different pairs in
order to avoid traffic collisions :-)
--

SC Tom


  #13  
Old February 7th 18, 02:18 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 749
Default I just bought a firestick

SC Tom wrote:


"Seymore4Head" wrote in message
...
On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 20:29:50 +0000 (GMT), "Rodney Pont"
wrote:

On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 14:37:19 -0500, Seymore4Head wrote:

It's a shame that Cat5 can't use piggyback connections. It would be
nice to share one Cat 5 between devices as I wouldn't ever be using
both devices at the same time.

You can send several connections at once down cat5 if you are using it
for ethernet, you just need a switch (or even a hub) at the tv end to
connect both devices. Your incoming cat5 goes into one port and you
have two short cables to connect to your two devices, just as you do
with a USB hub. You can just unplug one and plug in the other if you
wish as well but that will wear out the connections before very long.


I knew that you could use a hub. I was thinking more along the lines
of something like a phone splitter.

It would be nice if devices came with an in and an out like a modem
used to. Actually I guess modems still do that, but I haven't used
one in ages.




There is a splitter made (actually, many):
https://www.amazon.com/Insten-Ethernet-Splitter-Connector-Adapter/dp/B003C2QS90


You can only use one device at a time, though.
Check out the customer image gallery and it shows how you use two
splitters with one cable; maybe that would work. You would have one
splitter near your router with two ports connected to it, then the cable
that goes to your TV is plugged into the 2nd splitter, and then the TV
and Firestick, like this:
https://cdn.instructables.com/FQP/430D/O1NEP27ZK4R/FQP430DO1NEP27ZK4R.LARGE.jpg


I'm assuming both devices can be used at the same time using that
method. My assumption is that each "side" of the splitter uses two
different pairs in order to avoid traffic collisions :-)


GbE uses eight wires. Modern cables you might buy have
the eight wires inside. Four pairs.

10/100BT, you could use that with four wires. 1,2,3,6.
There might have been cables, more popular years ago,
with only the four wires in it. If you had
an Ethernet cable that "seemed thinner", that could
be a reason why.

When I put 10/100BT on my last Ethernet project at work,
I was only using four of the wires, and the other four
were unused.

So if you start with an eight wire cable, re-jig the pinout,
you should be able to make two "1,2,3,6" RJ45 ports out of it
and carry two 100BT connections independent of one
another. Each could be full duplex in its own right,
since one pair is TX, and the other pair RX.

A 10/100/1000 interface on a motherboard, can detect that
only 1,2,3,6 are wired, and it will automatically negotiate
100BT full duplex given a chance.

This gives 12.5MB/sec on each interface, and in both directions.
If 12.5MB/sec is enough for your application, then "go for it" :-)

Paul
  #14  
Old February 8th 18, 01:09 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Seymore4Head[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 15
Default I just bought a firestick

On Wed, 7 Feb 2018 08:31:16 -0500, "SC Tom" wrote:



"Seymore4Head" wrote in message
.. .
On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 20:29:50 +0000 (GMT), "Rodney Pont"
wrote:

On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 14:37:19 -0500, Seymore4Head wrote:

It's a shame that Cat5 can't use piggyback connections. It would be
nice to share one Cat 5 between devices as I wouldn't ever be using
both devices at the same time.

You can send several connections at once down cat5 if you are using it
for ethernet, you just need a switch (or even a hub) at the tv end to
connect both devices. Your incoming cat5 goes into one port and you
have two short cables to connect to your two devices, just as you do
with a USB hub. You can just unplug one and plug in the other if you
wish as well but that will wear out the connections before very long.


I knew that you could use a hub. I was thinking more along the lines
of something like a phone splitter.

It would be nice if devices came with an in and an out like a modem
used to. Actually I guess modems still do that, but I haven't used
one in ages.




There is a splitter made (actually, many):
https://www.amazon.com/Insten-Ethernet-Splitter-Connector-Adapter/dp/B003C2QS90

You can only use one device at a time, though.
Check out the customer image gallery and it shows how you use two splitters
with one cable; maybe that would work. You would have one splitter near your
router with two ports connected to it, then the cable that goes to your TV
is plugged into the 2nd splitter, and then the TV and Firestick, like this:
https://cdn.instructables.com/FQP/430D/O1NEP27ZK4R/FQP430DO1NEP27ZK4R.LARGE.jpg

I'm assuming both devices can be used at the same time using that method. My
assumption is that each "side" of the splitter uses two different pairs in
order to avoid traffic collisions :-)


I asked my niece how often they use the Firestick and she said not
much so I guess we won't be cutting the cable TV cord and I probably
will not worry about the buffering issue.

It is interesting that you can split the Cat5 as I had always heard
that it would not work.

The thing I had in mind was something that had a 3 port female similar
to the item you link to. If it was a 3 port female you would be able
to split the connection at the device side instead of splitting it at
the router.

  #15  
Old February 8th 18, 01:45 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
SC Tom
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default I just bought a firestick



"Seymore4Head" wrote in message
...
On Wed, 7 Feb 2018 08:31:16 -0500, "SC Tom" wrote:



"Seymore4Head" wrote in message
. ..
On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 20:29:50 +0000 (GMT), "Rodney Pont"
wrote:

On Tue, 06 Feb 2018 14:37:19 -0500, Seymore4Head wrote:

It's a shame that Cat5 can't use piggyback connections. It would be
nice to share one Cat 5 between devices as I wouldn't ever be using
both devices at the same time.

You can send several connections at once down cat5 if you are using it
for ethernet, you just need a switch (or even a hub) at the tv end to
connect both devices. Your incoming cat5 goes into one port and you
have two short cables to connect to your two devices, just as you do
with a USB hub. You can just unplug one and plug in the other if you
wish as well but that will wear out the connections before very long.

I knew that you could use a hub. I was thinking more along the lines
of something like a phone splitter.

It would be nice if devices came with an in and an out like a modem
used to. Actually I guess modems still do that, but I haven't used
one in ages.




There is a splitter made (actually, many):
https://www.amazon.com/Insten-Ethernet-Splitter-Connector-Adapter/dp/B003C2QS90

You can only use one device at a time, though.
Check out the customer image gallery and it shows how you use two
splitters
with one cable; maybe that would work. You would have one splitter near
your
router with two ports connected to it, then the cable that goes to your TV
is plugged into the 2nd splitter, and then the TV and Firestick, like
this:
https://cdn.instructables.com/FQP/430D/O1NEP27ZK4R/FQP430DO1NEP27ZK4R.LARGE.jpg

I'm assuming both devices can be used at the same time using that method.
My
assumption is that each "side" of the splitter uses two different pairs in
order to avoid traffic collisions :-)


I asked my niece how often they use the Firestick and she said not
much so I guess we won't be cutting the cable TV cord and I probably
will not worry about the buffering issue.

It is interesting that you can split the Cat5 as I had always heard
that it would not work.

The thing I had in mind was something that had a 3 port female similar
to the item you link to. If it was a 3 port female you would be able
to split the connection at the device side instead of splitting it at
the router.

You don't have to cut your existing cable; the adapter I linked has a
female-in for the existing e'net cable, then uses two patch cables at the
TV/Firestick. The wiring is already set-up inside the adapter to assign
which pairs where. Same for the router end; it's just that you would now
occupy two ports instead of one. I think it's similar to a phone splitter
for two numbers- pairs A & B for 555-0001 and pairs C & D for 555-0002 :-)
(Over-simplified explanation, of course; I don't want to hear back from any
CenturyLink techies, LOL!) As Paul posted, you're limited 100Mb.

Here's a better explanation (with pictures. I love pictures, LOL!) using a
similar, less expensive pair. The picture about 1/3 down the page has the
internal wiring diagram:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B076MNTV22/ref=psdc_3230976011_t2_B074VZ236M

Do you mean like a 3-port router (or 2 LAN + 1 WAN) at the TV? There's
something like this:
https://www.ubnt.com/edgemax/edgerouter-lite/ or
http://www.cyberdata.net/voip/011236v/ (Click on the Installation tab for
typical setups.)

I'm sure you could get a 4- or 5-port cheap on ebay instead of $100 for the
Ubiquiti, or $70 for the CyberData.
--

SC Tom



 




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