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Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot



 
 
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  #1  
Old January 1st 18, 03:07 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
SC Tom
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot

Recently (within the last couple of months), I have been having sporadic,
spontaneous shutdowns or reboots. The PC is only about 18 months old, and I
have made no changes to it in the last year or so. When it shuts down, I can
restart it without waiting; it starts up fine and immediately.
There are no entries in the event log other than for unexpected shutdown.
Core Temp shows no unusually high temps; it has never logged anything closer
than 35C to TjMax.
The inside and vents are clean- no cat hair or dust. The fans are all clean
and running well.
CHKDSK shows nothing wrong.
MEMTEST86+ returns no problems.

My specs a
Lenovo H50-55
AMD A10-7800 Radeon R7 (12 Compute Cores 4C+8G) 3.50 GHz
12GB Ram
2Tb C: drive (came with the PC)
1Tb D: drive (used for data and movies, etc.)
SATA DVD drive
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 video card
Corsair CX Series 600 Watt 80 Plus Bronze Certified Modular Power Supply
(replaced the original 180W PSU to power the video card- wasn't impressed
with the GPU graphics)
Logitech M705 mouse
MS SideWinder X4 keyboard

Windows 10 Home x64 V.1709 (Build 16299.125)

I'm getting ready to tear it down and check for puffed-up caps on the MB and
PSU, give it an extreme cleaning, and pull the heatsink and apply new paste
(replaced it about a year ago). Will reseat all cards, drive connectors, and
memory sticks. Might as well replace the CMOS battery while I have it apart.

Anything else I can check while I have it apart?

Thanks for any suggestions :-)

  #2  
Old January 1st 18, 04:52 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 749
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot

SC Tom wrote:
Recently (within the last couple of months), I have been having
sporadic, spontaneous shutdowns or reboots. The PC is only about 18
months old, and I have made no changes to it in the last year or so.
When it shuts down, I can restart it without waiting; it starts up fine
and immediately.
There are no entries in the event log other than for unexpected shutdown.
Core Temp shows no unusually high temps; it has never logged anything
closer than 35C to TjMax.
The inside and vents are clean- no cat hair or dust. The fans are all
clean and running well.
CHKDSK shows nothing wrong.
MEMTEST86+ returns no problems.

My specs a
Lenovo H50-55
AMD A10-7800 Radeon R7 (12 Compute Cores 4C+8G) 3.50 GHz
12GB Ram
2Tb C: drive (came with the PC)
1Tb D: drive (used for data and movies, etc.)
SATA DVD drive
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 video card
Corsair CX Series 600 Watt 80 Plus Bronze Certified Modular Power Supply
(replaced the original 180W PSU to power the video card- wasn't
impressed with the GPU graphics)
Logitech M705 mouse
MS SideWinder X4 keyboard

Windows 10 Home x64 V.1709 (Build 16299.125)

I'm getting ready to tear it down and check for puffed-up caps on the MB
and PSU, give it an extreme cleaning, and pull the heatsink and apply
new paste (replaced it about a year ago). Will reseat all cards, drive
connectors, and memory sticks. Might as well replace the CMOS battery
while I have it apart.

Anything else I can check while I have it apart?

Thanks for any suggestions :-)


A Google search suggests you should swap out the CX 600 and
test with a different PSU.

Paul
  #3  
Old January 1st 18, 05:23 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
SC Tom
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot



"Paul" wrote in message
news
SC Tom wrote:
Recently (within the last couple of months), I have been having sporadic,
spontaneous shutdowns or reboots. The PC is only about 18 months old, and
I have made no changes to it in the last year or so. When it shuts down,
I can restart it without waiting; it starts up fine and immediately.
There are no entries in the event log other than for unexpected shutdown.
Core Temp shows no unusually high temps; it has never logged anything
closer than 35C to TjMax.
The inside and vents are clean- no cat hair or dust. The fans are all
clean and running well.
CHKDSK shows nothing wrong.
MEMTEST86+ returns no problems.

My specs a
Lenovo H50-55
AMD A10-7800 Radeon R7 (12 Compute Cores 4C+8G) 3.50 GHz
12GB Ram
2Tb C: drive (came with the PC)
1Tb D: drive (used for data and movies, etc.)
SATA DVD drive
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 video card
Corsair CX Series 600 Watt 80 Plus Bronze Certified Modular Power Supply
(replaced the original 180W PSU to power the video card- wasn't impressed
with the GPU graphics)
Logitech M705 mouse
MS SideWinder X4 keyboard

Windows 10 Home x64 V.1709 (Build 16299.125)

I'm getting ready to tear it down and check for puffed-up caps on the MB
and PSU, give it an extreme cleaning, and pull the heatsink and apply new
paste (replaced it about a year ago). Will reseat all cards, drive
connectors, and memory sticks. Might as well replace the CMOS battery
while I have it apart.

Anything else I can check while I have it apart?

Thanks for any suggestions :-)


A Google search suggests you should swap out the CX 600 and
test with a different PSU.

Paul


I hadn't seen that. It had good reviews when I bought it :-(

I might have another PSU I could hook up externally; there's not much room
for a full-size in this case.

Thanks!
--
SC Tom


  #4  
Old January 1st 18, 08:35 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,260
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot

Paul wrote:

SC Tom wrote:
Recently (within the last couple of months), I have been having
sporadic, spontaneous shutdowns or reboots. The PC is only about 18
months old, and I have made no changes to it in the last year or so.
When it shuts down, I can restart it without waiting; it starts up fine
and immediately.
There are no entries in the event log other than for unexpected shutdown.
Core Temp shows no unusually high temps; it has never logged anything
closer than 35C to TjMax.
The inside and vents are clean- no cat hair or dust. The fans are all
clean and running well.
CHKDSK shows nothing wrong.
MEMTEST86+ returns no problems.

My specs a
Lenovo H50-55
AMD A10-7800 Radeon R7 (12 Compute Cores 4C+8G) 3.50 GHz
12GB Ram
2Tb C: drive (came with the PC)
1Tb D: drive (used for data and movies, etc.)
SATA DVD drive
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 video card
Corsair CX Series 600 Watt 80 Plus Bronze Certified Modular Power Supply
(replaced the original 180W PSU to power the video card- wasn't
impressed with the GPU graphics)
Logitech M705 mouse
MS SideWinder X4 keyboard

Windows 10 Home x64 V.1709 (Build 16299.125)

I'm getting ready to tear it down and check for puffed-up caps on the MB
and PSU, give it an extreme cleaning, and pull the heatsink and apply
new paste (replaced it about a year ago). Will reseat all cards, drive
connectors, and memory sticks. Might as well replace the CMOS battery
while I have it apart.

Anything else I can check while I have it apart?

Thanks for any suggestions :-)


A Google search suggests you should swap out the CX 600 and
test with a different PSU.


I've had a Corsair CX 600W in my salvaged PC for just over 4 years. No
one has absolutely no failures on their products, though. Corsair
doesn't build anything. They spec to the manufacture (Channel Well
Technologies aka CWT whose is the world's largest PSU maker and
contracts with numerous brands to build their PSUs). Corsair then slaps
on their "Corsair" sticker. Even FSP (aka Sparkle/Fortron) who builds
their own PSUs and also sells under the EVGA, Antec, OCZ,
Silverstone, Thermaltake, Nexus, and Zalman (maybe more) brands has had
some blooper models.

What I've seen of users of the Corsair CX600 where they complained one
unit failed, they replaced it with the same model, and that eventually
failed hints the problem was never with the PSU. "I used a spring-
loaded punch on a car's side window and it shattered. Replaced the
glass but the spring-loaded punch still breaks the window." The problem
wasn't with the window. Some users will report they see the fans
jiggle, the PSU comes up for a second or two, but then shuts off. That
could be a fan isn't spinning or the wrong type got used, like 3-pin on
a 4-pin mobo header, so the BIOS immediately shutdown the PSU because
it's prevent what it sees as a non-spinning CPU fan from causing the CPU
to burn up. I've seen fans that cease to send their RPM data so the
BIOS sees them as non-spinning. One wouldn't send RPM data except at
full RPM. On startup, the fans spin at max RPM and then get slowed to
reduce noise. Some users didn't connect the 8-pin cable to their video
card (because the foils in the mobo cannot handle the amperage). Some
mobos won't power up (shutdown the PSU) if there isn't a load beyond
some threshold, like 1 HDD + 2 fans or 2 HDDs or 1 HDD + 1 video card.
The load on the PSU is too light so the mobo (or is it the PSU?) thinks
there is a some problem and shuts down the PSU. Stable operation means
the PSU must experience a minimum load threshold. I've seen this min
threshold problem reported for Corsair PSUs; however, since I always
have 2, or more, HDDs (even when I added the SSD) along with using a
daughtercard video card instead of the dismal onboard graphics, I've not
encountered light-load shutdown problems with the Corsair PSU.

Can't really tell from the OP's specs if a 600W, any brand, would be
sufficient for the PC under full load of all components. While there's
the surge current on cold startup, the OP says his PC starts up okay.
Who knows what all he is running at the time of the shutdown. While
probably a bit overly safe, I get a PSU that handles twice the load with
the mobo fully populated (all connectors used to attach as many hard
drives, memory modules, dual video cards in SLI config, all daughtercard
slots filled, etc). PSUs wan in capacity over time so I want to start
big to make sure there is still plenty of over capacity 6-9 years later.
Maybe 600W really isn't big enough for his setup. A wattmeter (e.g.,
Killa-Watt) would show how much is going through the power cord, divide
by the PSU's efficiency rating (which is really on a benchmark spec on
the design and somewhat applicable to a new unit) to see how much power
his setup is consuming, then make sure there is plenty of reserve
capacity. Has he added any internally-powered components since
acquiring that pre-built?

I don't remember what Core Temp shows. The OP only mentions one
temperature which might be the overall or case temperature. Maybe he
needs to look at the individual core temps (there are 4 cores, not the
12 "compute cores" he mentions that AMDs spews because the other 8 come
from the GPU). I've found that my core temps for my Intel quad core are
not equal plus only 1 or 2 are actually inuse most of the time with only
short spikes in the other 2 cores. One core always ran hotter,
concerned me for awhile, but it's well within spec and seems to be its
natural behavior (that non-overclocked CPU is over 4 years old now).
TjMax means Tjunction temperature which is core temperature but the OP
lists only one. Maybe that's the max of all core temperatures. Looks
like his AMD CPU is rated for a TjMax of 71 C but he's only at 35 C
(which seems the unloaded running temperature so he doesn't use his
computer for anything but just leaves it powered on with only the OS
using the CPU?). Does Core Temp provide a chart showing history of
temperatures for all cores? If so, I'd watch that to see if there was a
spike in one, or more, core's temperature(s). I've never used the log
function in Speedfan to know it will save a history of readings into a
log file. Maybe Core Temp has a logging function. Once TjMax is hit,
the processor's THERMTRIP# signal will activate a shutdown. I don't use
AMD CPUs to know how accurate is their junction temperature sensors. I
don't trust any of them to be more accurate than 5 C of the real
temperature.
  #5  
Old January 1st 18, 08:36 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
VanguardLH[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,260
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot

SC Tom wrote:

Recently (within the last couple of months), I have been having sporadic,
spontaneous shutdowns or reboots. The PC is only about 18 months old, and I
have made no changes to it in the last year or so. When it shuts down, I can
restart it without waiting; it starts up fine and immediately.
There are no entries in the event log other than for unexpected shutdown.
Core Temp shows no unusually high temps; it has never logged anything closer
than 35C to TjMax.
The inside and vents are clean- no cat hair or dust. The fans are all clean
and running well.
CHKDSK shows nothing wrong.
MEMTEST86+ returns no problems.

My specs a
Lenovo H50-55
AMD A10-7800 Radeon R7 (12 Compute Cores 4C+8G) 3.50 GHz
12GB Ram
2Tb C: drive (came with the PC)
1Tb D: drive (used for data and movies, etc.)
SATA DVD drive
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 video card
Corsair CX Series 600 Watt 80 Plus Bronze Certified Modular Power Supply
(replaced the original 180W PSU to power the video card- wasn't impressed
with the GPU graphics)
Logitech M705 mouse
MS SideWinder X4 keyboard

Windows 10 Home x64 V.1709 (Build 16299.125)

I'm getting ready to tear it down and check for puffed-up caps on the MB and
PSU, give it an extreme cleaning, and pull the heatsink and apply new paste
(replaced it about a year ago). Will reseat all cards, drive connectors, and
memory sticks. Might as well replace the CMOS battery while I have it apart.

Anything else I can check while I have it apart?

Thanks for any suggestions :-)


How often a month do the unplanned shutdowns occur (which presumably
means the computer hardware powers off and not that the OS merely
shutdown but the hardware is fine)? If, say, 10 times a month, you
could try booting into safe mode to see if any hardware shutdowns happen
within a week.

Got a multimeter? If so, monitor the PSU's output voltages. Alas, that
won't show you the ripple in the voltage which an oscilloscope would
show but average DC voltage is a good check.

When was the last time you use compressed air to dust out the inside?
Did you use ear swabs on the fan blades to eliminate that source of
inbalance and turbulence? Did you also blow out the PSU (both
directions)? If there are any flat ribbon cables inside, are they
oriented to permit air flow past them or do they block air flow? A
looksie inside may show no accumulated dust on the mobo but how are you
going to see into the fins of the CPU heatsink, the fins of the video
card's heatsink (which could be underneath a pretty plastic shell), or
inside the PSU?

Can't tell if you have 2 drives (with C: and D: partitions that span the
each entire drive) or one drive with 2 partitions (for C: and D. Did
you monitor the temperature(s) of the drive(s)? You might want to leave
a drive bay empty between to let them cool better, or leave one in the
3.5" drive cage and move the other up into a 5.25" bay using an adapter.

Memtest won't much stress the components on the mobo. Prime95 does a
better job of burn-in testing.

Did you remove all memory modules except one and use that for awhile,
and then proceed to use each module by itself for awhile, to make sure
each works under whatever stress you place on memory? I've seen where
memtest returns zero errors after many runs over several days but memory
failures appear the moment I load Windows and use some apps.

Go into the BIOS and check what is it its threshold for max CPU. Could
be the CPU looks fine to Core Temp but is beyond the threshold
configured in the BIOS. Also spin the fans to see if they spin freely
or if you can feel resistance or bumpiness in rotation. If they stick
then maybe they stopped spinning when they are silenced by slowing their
RPM, and a stop CPU fan will have the BIOS shutdown the PSU to protect
the CPU. Also check you don't have 2 fans blowing against each other.
For example, the interior or underside of the PSU's fan suck air in. If
the CPU's fan is blowing across the heatsink but opposite to the PSU's
airflow then they work against each other and air flow is reduced. A
couple of nearby fans sucking or blowing against each other will reduce
airflow. If there's dust inside the PSU, its airflow is reduced. Don't
rely on what you see. Get some duster cans and blow it all out.
  #6  
Old January 1st 18, 09:58 PM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
SC Tom
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 429
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot

***Replies in line

"VanguardLH" wrote in message
...
SC Tom wrote:

Recently (within the last couple of months), I have been having sporadic,
spontaneous shutdowns or reboots. The PC is only about 18 months old, and
I
have made no changes to it in the last year or so. When it shuts down, I
can
restart it without waiting; it starts up fine and immediately.
There are no entries in the event log other than for unexpected shutdown.
Core Temp shows no unusually high temps; it has never logged anything
closer
than 35C to TjMax.
The inside and vents are clean- no cat hair or dust. The fans are all
clean
and running well.
CHKDSK shows nothing wrong.
MEMTEST86+ returns no problems.

My specs a
Lenovo H50-55
AMD A10-7800 Radeon R7 (12 Compute Cores 4C+8G) 3.50 GHz
12GB Ram
2Tb C: drive (came with the PC)
1Tb D: drive (used for data and movies, etc.)
SATA DVD drive
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 video card
Corsair CX Series 600 Watt 80 Plus Bronze Certified Modular Power Supply
(replaced the original 180W PSU to power the video card- wasn't impressed
with the GPU graphics)
Logitech M705 mouse
MS SideWinder X4 keyboard

Windows 10 Home x64 V.1709 (Build 16299.125)

I'm getting ready to tear it down and check for puffed-up caps on the MB
and
PSU, give it an extreme cleaning, and pull the heatsink and apply new
paste
(replaced it about a year ago). Will reseat all cards, drive connectors,
and
memory sticks. Might as well replace the CMOS battery while I have it
apart.

Anything else I can check while I have it apart?

Thanks for any suggestions :-)


How often a month do the unplanned shutdowns occur (which presumably
means the computer hardware powers off and not that the OS merely
shutdown but the hardware is fine)?

*** Twice in December, once each on the 2nd and the 29th, and once this
morning.

If, say, 10 times a month, you
could try booting into safe mode to see if any hardware shutdowns happen
within a week.

Got a multimeter? If so, monitor the PSU's output voltages. Alas, that
won't show you the ripple in the voltage which an oscilloscope would
show but average DC voltage is a good check.

*** Voltages read fine.


When was the last time you use compressed air to dust out the inside?

*** Two weeks ago. I do that every 3-4 weeks. Dust around here is terrible,
plus I own a long-hair cat.

Did you use ear swabs on the fan blades to eliminate that source of
inbalance and turbulence? Did you also blow out the PSU (both
directions)?

*** Yep

If there are any flat ribbon cables inside, are they
oriented to permit air flow past them or do they block air flow? A
looksie inside may show no accumulated dust on the mobo but how are you
going to see into the fins of the CPU heatsink, the fins of the video
card's heatsink (which could be underneath a pretty plastic shell), or
inside the PSU?

*** No flat cable (all SATA, and my PSU cables are wrapped round). The area
around the CPU heatsink is open enough to see through it with my flashlight
and inspection mirror.
The video card does have a shell, but I remove it to clean its
heatsink and fan. The PSU gets blown out well from both ends. Using a
flashlight, I can see through it pretty well, at least well enough to see
there is no large build-up of anything.


Can't tell if you have 2 drives (with C: and D: partitions that span the
each entire drive) or one drive with 2 partitions (for C: and D. Did
you monitor the temperature(s) of the drive(s)? You might want to leave
a drive bay empty between to let them cool better, or leave one in the
3.5" drive cage and move the other up into a 5.25" bay using an adapter.

*** Two separate drives. They are mounted vertically, on above the other,
long side parallel to the ground. I have not monitored their temps, but they
are in the intake air stream.


Memtest won't much stress the components on the mobo. Prime95 does a
better job of burn-in testing.

*** For grins and giggles, I downloaded and ran Memtest86+ v5.10 (I had
v4.20). It ran for a while with no errors, then locked up. Booted the disk,
ran it again, and same thing. I replace the RAM with some known good RAM out
of an old PC (same speed RAM, but only have 8GB now instead of 12). The PC
seems to be running well so far as I type this :-)

Did you remove all memory modules except one and use that for awhile,
and then proceed to use each module by itself for awhile, to make sure
each works under whatever stress you place on memory? I've seen where
memtest returns zero errors after many runs over several days but memory
failures appear the moment I load Windows and use some apps.

Go into the BIOS and check what is it its threshold for max CPU. Could
be the CPU looks fine to Core Temp but is beyond the threshold
configured in the BIOS. Also spin the fans to see if they spin freely
or if you can feel resistance or bumpiness in rotation. If they stick
then maybe they stopped spinning when they are silenced by slowing their
RPM, and a stop CPU fan will have the BIOS shutdown the PSU to protect
the CPU. Also check you don't have 2 fans blowing against each other.
For example, the interior or underside of the PSU's fan suck air in. If
the CPU's fan is blowing across the heatsink but opposite to the PSU's
airflow then they work against each other and air flow is reduced. A
couple of nearby fans sucking or blowing against each other will reduce
airflow. If there's dust inside the PSU, its airflow is reduced. Don't
rely on what you see. Get some duster cans and blow it all out.

*** BIOS on this PC has no temp readings or settings :-( The fans are
pulling from front to rear. The fins on the CPU heatsink are in-line with
that airflow, so the CPU fan blows down through the fins and the warm air is
pulled out. Some may be pulled through the PSU, but it's an inch and a half
or so above the closed sides of the heatsink (it's a CoolerMaster Vortex
Plus).
I have an attachment for my office vac that blows a nice stream of air. As
often as I clean my PC's (and the wife's), I'd use all my SSI for compressed
air cans :-)

Thanks for your in-depth replies. To answer part of your other reply to
Paul, Coretemp measures the core tempertures, not the ambient air. The temp
I listed IS an average- my first two cores generally run 2-4 warmer than
the other two (and yes, I know the other 8 cores are the GPU, which I don't
have enabled).

I had another Corsair PSU, a TX650 v2, that is only 6-8 months old. I went
ahead and put it in since I had everything apart anyhow. Tight fit, but it
DID go in without customizing the case. Airflow around the vents is still
good. According to Cooler Master's PSU calculator, my load wattage is
approximately 241W, so a 600W or 650W PSU should be plenty.

I'll post back here if it was all for naught. I'm keeping my fingers crossed
;-)

Thanks again to both of you for replying :-)
--

SC Tom


  #7  
Old January 2nd 18, 05:49 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Bill[_37_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot

SC Tom wrote:
Recently (within the last couple of months), I have been having
sporadic, spontaneous shutdowns or reboots. The PC is only about 18
months old, and I have made no changes to it in the last year or so.
When it shuts down, I can restart it without waiting; it starts up
fine and immediately.


I had a problem like that once and it was the result of an extra "pin"
in the case which didn't align with a hole in the motherboard. Someone
else on the Internet solved exactly the same problem with the same
case/MB combination so I ended up only had to slide some electrical tape
under the known problem spot of the MB to fix the problem (i.e. I didn't
have to remove the MB). Before I found my "fix" I was producing
"spurious results" by pressing down at various placed on the MB. You
might try that after you check out your power supply. Good luck!

BTW, I recall now that I had a similar problem in another computer
whenever Norton Antivirus woke up the computer to perform an "automatic
update". I ended up solving that problem by switching to a different AV
program. My only guess was that my (Corsair) 750W power supply caused
too much of a power surge?

Bill


There are no entries in the event log other than for unexpected shutdown.
Core Temp shows no unusually high temps; it has never logged anything
closer than 35C to TjMax.
The inside and vents are clean- no cat hair or dust. The fans are all
clean and running well.
CHKDSK shows nothing wrong.
MEMTEST86+ returns no problems.

My specs a
Lenovo H50-55
AMD A10-7800 Radeon R7 (12 Compute Cores 4C+8G) 3.50 GHz
12GB Ram
2Tb C: drive (came with the PC)
1Tb D: drive (used for data and movies, etc.)
SATA DVD drive
Nvidia GeForce GTX 750 video card
Corsair CX Series 600 Watt 80 Plus Bronze Certified Modular Power
Supply (replaced the original 180W PSU to power the video card- wasn't
impressed with the GPU graphics)
Logitech M705 mouse
MS SideWinder X4 keyboard

Windows 10 Home x64 V.1709 (Build 16299.125)

I'm getting ready to tear it down and check for puffed-up caps on the
MB and PSU, give it an extreme cleaning, and pull the heatsink and
apply new paste (replaced it about a year ago). Will reseat all cards,
drive connectors, and memory sticks. Might as well replace the CMOS
battery while I have it apart.

Anything else I can check while I have it apart?

Thanks for any suggestions :-)


  #8  
Old January 2nd 18, 06:09 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Paul[_26_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 749
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot

Bill wrote:


I had a problem like that once and it was the result of an extra "pin"
in the case which didn't align with a hole in the motherboard. Someone
else on the Internet solved exactly the same problem with the same
case/MB combination so I ended up only had to slide some electrical tape
under the known problem spot of the MB to fix the problem (i.e. I didn't
have to remove the MB). Before I found my "fix" I was producing
"spurious results" by pressing down at various placed on the MB. You
might try that after you check out your power supply. Good luck!

BTW, I recall now that I had a similar problem in another computer
whenever Norton Antivirus woke up the computer to perform an "automatic
update". I ended up solving that problem by switching to a different AV
program. My only guess was that my (Corsair) 750W power supply caused
too much of a power surge?

Bill


The motherboards that are threaded, it's up to the user
to figure out which inserts to install. They can have multiple
patterns on the tray, and you have to compare the hole pattern
on your new motherboard, to the options on the tray.

There was at least one Asus motherboard, where one of the
standard holes, an audio component on the solder side was
too close to the standoff, and it would short out. There
will be rare occasions where you have to not install a
standoff in a location like that.

And as for the computer cases with the "bumps" instead of
tapped tray and brass standoff, just don't buy those.
If there's anything wrong with a bump, it could need
electrical tape or even dremel work. it's not worth it.

When you have a sub-sized motherboard (outside profile
smaller than the standard, like a 9.6"x7.0" microATX
versus standard 9.6"x9.6"), you can place a rubber eraser
under the unsupported edge of the smaller motherboard.
And slice the eraser to the correct height. That gives
support while inserting DIMMs. There's no support
though, if you're later pulling up on a component.
A "short" board tends to lose three mounting holes
on the edge, which is where the erasers come in.

Paul
  #9  
Old January 2nd 18, 06:45 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Bill[_37_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot

Paul wrote:
Bill wrote:


I had a problem like that once and it was the result of an extra
"pin" in the case which didn't align with a hole in the motherboard.
Someone else on the Internet solved exactly the same problem with the
same case/MB combination so I ended up only had to slide some
electrical tape under the known problem spot of the MB to fix the
problem (i.e. I didn't have to remove the MB). Before I found my
"fix" I was producing "spurious results" by pressing down at various
placed on the MB. You might try that after you check out your power
supply. Good luck!

BTW, I recall now that I had a similar problem in another computer
whenever Norton Antivirus woke up the computer to perform an
"automatic update". I ended up solving that problem by switching to
a different AV program. My only guess was that my (Corsair) 750W
power supply caused too much of a power surge?

Bill


The motherboards that are threaded, it's up to the user
to figure out which inserts to install. They can have multiple
patterns on the tray, and you have to compare the hole pattern
on your new motherboard, to the options on the tray.

Yes, I bought the computer "semi-built" (a few components installed in
the case).
I took it to a computer repair shop and they charged me forty or fifty
dollars to recommend that I send it back to the vendor. I sent it back
to the vendor, on my dime, and they returned it to me having the same
problem. Fortunately, I ran across the problem/fix. Since then, I've
become a bit more knowledgeable about working on computers (but I'm
observing that this is sort of a moving target, albeit a slowly moving one)

HNY,
Bill





There was at least one Asus motherboard, where one of the
standard holes, an audio component on the solder side was
too close to the standoff, and it would short out. There
will be rare occasions where you have to not install a
standoff in a location like that.

And as for the computer cases with the "bumps" instead of
tapped tray and brass standoff, just don't buy those.
If there's anything wrong with a bump, it could need
electrical tape or even dremel work. it's not worth it.

When you have a sub-sized motherboard (outside profile
smaller than the standard, like a 9.6"x7.0" microATX
versus standard 9.6"x9.6"), you can place a rubber eraser
under the unsupported edge of the smaller motherboard.
And slice the eraser to the correct height. That gives
support while inserting DIMMs. There's no support
though, if you're later pulling up on a component.
A "short" board tends to lose three mounting holes
on the edge, which is where the erasers come in.

Paul


  #10  
Old January 2nd 18, 07:41 AM posted to alt.comp.hardware.pc-homebuilt
Flasherly[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,022
Default Spontaneous Shutdown/Reboot

On Tue, 2 Jan 2018 00:49:06 -0500, Bill wrote:

Before I found my "fix" I was producing
"spurious results" by pressing down at various placed on the MB. You
might try that after you check out your power supply. Good luck!


Yeppers. Variously "fixing" a few tubed amps with that method.
Breadboard the chassis and use a rubber tube (ink eraser) for
carefully pressure-testing audio dropouts. Hit-&-miss, or less than
ideal factoring for "re-flowing" solder joints. Amps and Fx pedal
boards, although usual and common fixes, being for not much other
choice;...Least to mention cheap, being on my time.

I've noted others use refrigeration (spray cans) for quick freezing
areas with suspect "cold" solder joints in a similar fashion.

Ribbons and PC data cables are another frequent area now for cutting
amp costs, additions to a list of amp features that may oxidize into
turning up suspect. Some pull them and redo the connections as a
point-to-point safeguard.

With a computer there's no re-flowing, and QC issues involving
physical continuity at a core componentry level becomes altogether
unacceptable.
 




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